The 4 Types of Talks You Need as a Speaker and Thought Leader with Carol Cox and Diane Diaz [Goals & Planning Series]: Podcast Ep. 205

The 4 Types of Talks You Need as a Speaker and Thought Leader with Carol Cox and Diane Diaz [Goals & Planning Series]: Podcast Ep. 205 | Speaking Your Brand

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I talk quite a bit on this podcast about signature talks – why you should have one and what goes into one.

Your signature talk is your foundation for your brand message and story. It showcases who you are, what you do, who you do it for, and why it matters.

We’ve worked with our clients for the past 5 years to help them create their signature talk, which they’ve used for presentations (in-person and virtually) for brand awareness, lead generation, keynotes, and TEDx talks.

In this episode, Diane Diaz and I talk about:

  • 4 types of talks you should have as an entrepreneur, speaker, and thought leader
  • When you should use each type
  • Examples of each
  • My favorite type of talk
  • What the women in our Thought Leader Academy are currently working on

This episode is part of our series on Goals & Planning.

About Us: The Speaking Your Brand podcast is hosted by Carol Cox, joined in this episode by our lead speaking coach Diane Diaz. At Speaking Your Brand, we help women entrepreneurs and professionals clarify their brand message and story, create their signature talks, and develop their thought leadership platforms. Our mission is to get more women in positions of influence and power because it’s through women’s stories and visibility that we challenge the status quo and change existing systems. Check out our coaching programs at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com.

 

Links:

Show notes at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/205

Get instant access to our Webinar Idea to Launch on-demand training: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/webinar-course 

Schedule a consult call to talk about creating your signature talk and thought leadership platform: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/contact

Get on the interest list for our Thought Leader Academy: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/academy/

Maureen Taylor’s webinar results on Nikki Rausch’s Sales Maven podcast: https://yoursalesmaven.com/how-to-make-your-free-webinar-profitable-a-client-success-story/

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205-SYB-4-types-of-talks.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

205-SYB-4-types-of-talks.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Carol Cox:
Learn about the four types of talks you need as a speaker and thought leader on this episode of the Speaking Your Brand podcast.

Carol Cox:
More and more women are making an impact by starting businesses running for office and speaking up for what matters. With my background as a TV political analyst, entrepreneur and speaker, I interview and coach purpose driven women to shape their brands, grow their companies, and become recognized as influencers in their field. This is Speaking Your Brand, your place to learn how to persuasively communicate your message to your audience.

Carol Cox:
Hi there and welcome to the Speaking Your Brand podcast. This is your host Carol Cox, joined again today by our lead speaking coach, Diane Diaz.

Diane Diaz:
Hello.

Carol Cox:
This is the final episode in the series that we've been doing on goals and planning throughout the month of December. And we decided to do this one on four types of talks that you need as a speaker and as a thought leader. And this topic jumped out to me because right now the women who are in our Thought Leader Academy are working on their signature talks during this month's module. So we just did a training call for them all about how to create their signature talk, and so they're super excited about it. And so we thought that we would share with you all how to take your signature talk and actually create four different versions of it, which we're going to talk about today. So the different versions are one version for lead generation and brand awareness, one version as a webinar where you're actually selling something on the webinar. So a direct response sale from the webinar. A third version is a keynote style, and the fourth version is a TEDx style talk. So we're going to go over the the similarities and the differences between these four types of talks and how you can start thinking about how to develop those. And if you're new to the podcast, welcome. We're so glad that you're here and speaking your brand, we help women entrepreneurs and professionals like you clarify your brand, message and story, create your signature talk and develop your thought leadership platform. And we do that through our Thought Leader Academy program, as well as by working with our clients one on one. And if you would like to get more information about how we can work together, you can do that on our website.

Carol Cox:
Go to speaking your brand, and we also invite you to schedule a consultation call with us to chat about what you're speaking goals are and how we could potentially work together. So Diane, let us chat about these four different types of talks. And you know, what's interesting to me is that this is we've been talking quite a bit on the podcast about the silver linings of COVID, that pandemic this year and how much it has really caused us to think about speaking in a new way. So speaking is not just in person, in front of a group of people on a stage, but thinking more universally about how we communicate our message in different formats, different audiences. And I know that before this year, when we would work with our clients on their signature talk, we were very much focused on the in-person presentation, which is of course what most of them did. And then when the lockdown started, we're like, Oh, we have to help them now shift to a webinar, virtual type of presentation. And then we did our summit in October and we helped our speakers develop their TEDx style talks. And so now I've seen how actually these different types of talks work hand in hand with each other and reinforce the message that the particular speaker entrepreneur is putting out there. So really working on all of them, having these different talks kind of in on in like kind of in hand, ready to go can be super beneficial.

Diane Diaz:
Absolutely. Because I think even if you're doing, for example, a keynote talk, you're still promoting yourself, right? You might not be directly selling something, but understanding how that keynote talk might connect to what you do sell is helpful. So having worked through these four types of talks gets you a lot of clarity as the speaker and then helps you better message yourself to your audience in all ways.

Carol Cox:
And I've also found that it keeps it interesting for us as speakers too, because you don't want to deliver the same exact presentation time after time. I mean, I don't know, maybe we're unusual because this is what we do for a living. So we'd love to create your presentations, but we like to think of related topics, but different things. But so we'll, we'll do some webinars and some presentations that are very tactical. So like how to repurpose your in-person presentation into a virtual webinar. So very tactical, but I also really enjoy it. I know you do. Also, Diane is doing like more of a story driven, values driven type of talk, which is where like the keynotes and the style talks come in.

Diane Diaz:
Yes, I think doing those two really helps you as the speaker to be able to see what the connection is that you can make with your audience. Whereas if you're doing lead generation talk, that's one thing. But when you start to dive into the more story driven ones, like, like a TED talk or TED talk, you understand how to make that emotional connection, which is super important again for promoting yourself. And whatever you might be selling.

Carol Cox:
And then you can take some of those elements that you did for the textile talk and almost like it gives you, like doing the textile talk gives you permission to be more story driven and to be more values driven. And then you can take those and put it into your, quote unquote, more business type presentation, which actually just ends up adding so much more depth and dimension to that type of lead generation presentation that your audience will connect with you even more so.

Diane Diaz:
Yes, absolutely. I love that.

Carol Cox:
So then let's go through four different types of talks. And and for those of you listening to kind of give you an idea of how to think about them and where to start. So let's first talk about what is the signature talk to begin with. So I like to think of a signature talk as the foundation of the messaging that you're doing. So it's about who you are, who you help, what you help them to do, how you help them and why it matters. So like those are the different components. And so as you're working on your signature talk, you think about what is your audience want related to your topic, what is their goal, what obstacles are standing in the way that are preventing them from getting what they want? What do you see that is like the real problem that they may not recognize? So like your credibility is baked into this because of your expertise and your skill set and your background. And then you share in your signature talk your approach to help the audience get past those obstacles to their goal. So this could be your framework, your methodology, your process. You include examples, case study stories in there, and then you leave your audience with the next step. So a next step that they can do on their own and then a next step that they can do with you. So something that they can purchase from you or a console call. So some type of call to action for them to to go further, to go deeper with you.

Carol Cox:
So your signature talk really becomes a foundation for your brand message and your story. And then you take that and you can repurpose it and use it in so many different ways. I remember I did an episode back 116, so this is this is we're in the two hundreds now. So this was a while ago and I'll later in the show notes, but it was called 16 Ways You Can Use Your Signature Talk. So there are so many different ways to repurpose it other than just for traditional presentations. So here's the thing with your signature talk is that you can present it to different types of audiences. You can do it to other people's communities, other people's groups, industry associations, businesses, networking groups, business groups, locally, whether whenever we get back to in person, you can do it their conferences. So in person, virtual. So a signature talk is very robust and it's also very flexible. So you can kind of you can shorten it, you can lengthen it depending on how much time you have and the format that you're using it in. So as we were planning this episode, I was thinking about different examples that we could share. And so we've had some of our clients who have been podcast guest here. So you may recognize some of their names. So like Joy Spencer, when we work together on her signature talk earlier in 2020, she had a framework that she was using with her coaching clients called Create.

Carol Cox:
So it was an acronym that had these six letters, and each letter stood for a certain part of her process that she went through. So when we created her signature talk, we included stories and client examples related to the work that she did. And we pulled out a few of these letters, a few of the six letters to go a little bit deeper. But the fun part about it was that part of the process was I asked Joi to tell me how she grew up. Like, what was she like as a kid, what did she like to do? And she ended up sharing the story about how this teacher of hers, when she was in, I think it was middle school, they would put on plays and it was an international school that she went to. They would put on plays, but the teacher would not give them the script. Like if you're going to go do a play, you usually get a script and you memorize your lines and you do that. But instead this teacher was like, Okay, here's the premise of the play. Now you, the students, you go create it yourself. Like you just go create the dialogue, create the costumes, create flesh out the characters. And it was kind of like an ad hoc play versus a scripted play. So that so because I asked her that question and she shared that story, it then it made so much more sense why this create process and framework was so meaningful to her.

Diane Diaz:
Yeah, yeah, that's good.

Carol Cox:
So think about as you create your signature talk, why is it that you do what you do in your business? Why is it that you do it the way that you do it? Like what thread do you see from when you were younger to where you are today? Where you can look back and say, Oh, I've always loved that. Now I see how that is become a part of what I do without me really being conscious of it.

Diane Diaz:
Yeah, I love that.

Carol Cox:
And then the other example that comes to mind is Jaimee Tynan. She has the 100 by 20. 30 initiative to support more women of color in health care and shows. She had her framework, which was the five C's of great sponsors. So she used alliteration, which we love. We love alliteration and we love acronyms. So she had these five C's of great sponsors. So again, we in her talk, she gave an overview of all five of those C's, and then she dove into a few of them in her talk to to kind of give more details to the audience. And then her call to action was to get individuals and organizations in the health care industry to sign on to her initiative to support women of color in health care. So to find women that they could mentor and advocate for and to sponsor. So a signature talk can be used to get people interested in working with. You can also be used to get people aware and interested in your thought leadership project, like Jamie's initiative. So I know that some of the women who are in our Thought Leader Academy right now, their thought leadership project, which is part of what they work on, they're thinking about is it going to be a new podcast? Is it going to be an initiative, a movement, a challenge? How are they going to get people excited about it? And then their signature talk is going to take their audience on this journey so that they can say, Oh, like I see the benefit of this type of project and I want to get behind it and get involved in it.

Carol Cox:
So that is the signature. So your signature talk is a foundation. Again, you can use it for both in-person presentations and virtual presentations. It could be for brand awareness. It could be about your thought leadership project, and it could also be to get people interested in you and what you do. But so it could have a strong call to action, like a strong sales call to action. Or it could not. It can go either way. Now, the second type is would be webinars that are specifically used for selling what I call direct response or sales webinars. And I know, Diane, we experimented with some of these earlier this year because of COVID. Yes. And it was actually a it was a lot of fun because we had a we hadn't done webinars in a while.

Diane Diaz:
No, no, it was fun. I think it also felt like a really good new fun challenge to see how we could make them effective. And also, I think for us to practice what we preach. Right, and then demonstrate through what we're doing, demonstrate how you can create this webinar using this signature talk framework, right?

Carol Cox:
Yeah, exactly. And so we like so we have our speaking your brand framework, which is what our clients, what we use with our clients one on one. And then what the women in the Thought Leader Academy just got trained on how to use for their own presentations. And so the webinar for webinars, we use the same thing. We tweak it slightly just for virtual presentations compared to in-person. And here's the biggest thing with using webinars for selling is that you have to start with what is the offer that you want to sell at the end? So you get really clear on that. And I like to say one offer. Yes, right. Not to not five ways that people can work with you, one offer. You start with that and then you work your way backwards into. So what is the content that your audience needs to hear and what do they need to learn and to know in order for them to say, Oh, that offer is perfect now? Because that's exactly going to address what this need is or what this gap is that I have.

Diane Diaz:
Yes, because I feel like it's a much more immediate action on a webinar versus the giving a talk and possibly making a call to action there in person, you know, 45 minutes or whatever on a webinar, you're walking them down the path of working with you.

Carol Cox:
Yes. Because you have like this captive audience. Yes. And they're there in front of their computers. They can go to the sales page. They can put their credit card in right away versus the in-person presentation. Yes, you can use a feedback form. You could use a credit card form and definitely do that with a webinar. You don't really want to leave them with just a feedback form or a survey. You want to capture their interest right away. And so I was thinking about examples for this and Maureen Taylor, who's the photo detective, and we've worked with her for a while and she has an incredible email list. She's done speaking in person for quite a while. And obviously with COVID, all of her in-person speaking engagements got canceled. And so then she was some of our encouragement, as well as encouragement from others. She decided to do some webinars and she had such an amazing response.

Diane Diaz:
She has. I mean, I think it's it's certainly beyond my expectations, possibly even beyond hers. But she is really, really effective with her webinars. So that just goes to show you what the possibilities are.

Carol Cox:
She had, I think on one of her webinars, over 800 people registered and then obviously then she and then she sold her. She has some online courses that she offers that she already had had on her website, but she would kind of sell them here or there. But she made that again, that direct pitch on the webinar sold quite a bit and. I remember that she did an episode on Nikki Roche's podcast, which is called Your Sales Maven. I'll include a link in the show notes. Nikki's podcast is fantastic if you want to get more info on sales strategies and they talk specifically about this and some of the details about the registration numbers and how it converted and some of the things she did. So I recommend you all to go listen to that because it works like if you have an interested audience with a very specific topic and niche, you can get great results.

Diane Diaz:
And if your webinar is connected to what it is that you're offering, if it's very connected and you walk them down that path, like you said, you can get excellent results. And that's exactly what Maureen did.

Carol Cox:
And a lot of people sometimes wonder, like with Zoom fatigue, with everyone being on lockdown and having all these Zoom calls all year, are people tired of them? And my answer is no if you do them well.

Diane Diaz:
Right? Exactly, yes. Are they tired of some of them? Absolutely. But are they tired of really good ones that are effective, that they're interested in? No, they're not they're not tired of those.

Carol Cox:
If you do them well, they will always have a great response. But no one ever likes boring presentations.

Diane Diaz:
Of any kind.

Carol Cox:
What season it is.

Diane Diaz:
Right in person, online, anywhere. Nobody likes boring presentations.

Carol Cox:
Exactly. So that is the second type would be using webinars for selling. And we have a course that we created because we ran a live program in April or in May and June to help women create their webinars for for selling. And so we ended up packaging up that live program into an online course. So as video tutorials, everything from how to identify your offer and topic to using our framework to create your webinar content to the sales emails to send out how to get people to actually attend live. So that is available. If you go to speaking your brand slash webinar course, all the information is there and you can get instant access. So once you sign up for it, once you purchase it, you get directed to the online course platform and you can start going through it at your own pace and you can take as long as you want to or go through it as quickly as you want to. So if you're thinking about doing webinars in 2021 as part of your visibility and marketing and sales strategy, definitely check out that course again. Is that speaking your brand dot com slash webinar dash course third type would be keynotes.

Carol Cox:
Now I generally associate keynotes with in-person conferences. You know, the speaker on the stage, the opening speaker, the closing speaker giving their keynotes. I know that conferences that have gone virtual have their keynote speakers doing virtual presentations. So you can definitely do keynotes virtually. I feel like there is it's just a bigger impact doing them in person because of the style. And my recommendation is if you're going to be presenting virtually, you have to do a lot of audience engagement to keep people interested versus a traditional keynote tends to like you're not. You generally don't shout out questions to an audience of 1000 people at a conference. Right, right. On a keynote. Yet I know that there have been speakers who do it, but here is what I heard from. I talked to a colleague earlier this summer and she said that she had a number of speakers that she was working with and what she does with them and that a lot of them did not change. One thing about their keynote from when they would use to do it in person to do it virtually. And guess what? Totally bombed.

Diane Diaz:
Not good.

Carol Cox:
These are professional speakers who get paid a lot of money and it did not work virtually.

Diane Diaz:
Because you can't do the same style, it can't all be the same. You have to adjust for the virtual environment.

Carol Cox:
So you do have to do more audience engagement. You have to keep you have to fluctuate the energy. You have to keep the energy up. Like maybe use some props, maybe use some costumes, maybe set up your background differently than you would normally do. Absolutely. And so for keynotes, generally, the audiences tend to be companies, again, industry associations, organizations who are putting on conferences for their membership or putting on conferences where people buy tickets to. So that's generally what the audiences are. Most of the time. Speakers get paid to deliver their keynotes, or at least they should be paid because if they're being selected as a keynote speaker, the conference should be paying them a speaking fee. And with keynotes, unlike with the webinars or at the signature talk for lead generation, keynotes are really a combination of some strategic content, but it's really more about inspiration and motivation. It's entertainment when it comes down to it, because the conference wants a speaker who's going to engage the audience, entertain the audience. You could call it edutainment. So some object education in there, but some entertainment. And I know, Diane, you did a keynote a way back in the day. This was like, what, spring of 2019 at a at an in-person conference?

Diane Diaz:
Yes. That was in Tampa. It was for the working women of Tampa Bay. They're their state conference. And they had it was done a little bit differently because I'm typically used to there being one opening keynote speaker and one closing. But they had several I think they had maybe four or five sort of main keynote speakers and then a bunch of other like breakout speakers. So I was one of those keynote speakers and I think the amount of time I had was something like 12 minutes or something. And so the theme of the whole event was Your Season to Shine. And then my talk was Shine the Light on You. So I was focusing, focusing on that idea of of sort of being a champion of your own personal brand, right? And getting yourself out there and and tooting your own horn, so to speak. So I created this acronym, and I, of course, I used the speaking your brand framework, of course. And I created an acronym to use called Brag, which was to boost your self confidence. And then, of course, I gave examples of how to do that, resist comparison. Act as if so sort of feeling like you can do it and then grow your brand. So taking these action steps to brag about yourself, to be your own champion, to shine the light on you. So and it went over I think there were 300 women in attendance at that event. And I think it went really well. I mean, it was very well received. Now, obviously, I wasn't really it was no opportunity to sell anything, as was keynote style. But I got a pretty good reception and I, I did get an email afterwards, maybe like a week later from someone who attended telling me how much that brag acronym impacted her and she was actually going to share it with her young son.

Carol Cox:
Oh, that's so nice.

Diane Diaz:
Yeah. So that was nice that I felt like the message really got across.

Carol Cox:
And that's the other benefit of having an acronym or an alliteration when you're presenting your content is because it makes it so much more memorable for the audience.

Diane Diaz:
Yes, totally. Several people were like, I will not forget that because it's easy brag. It's four letters. It makes a word easy to remember.

Carol Cox:
And then you also did the keynote for the Orlando Women's Conference, and that was about, what, 20 minutes or so for that length of time?

Diane Diaz:
Yes, I think it was something like 22 minutes. Yeah. Yeah. So that was a little bit longer and it was a little bit of a different style. Now, there were 600 women in that one. That was my first keynote ever and the biggest group I ever spoke to. And you know, like you were saying, because it was physically on a stage in person back in the day when we did that, it was a much different experience and much more. You don't ask questions you're trying to inspire and maybe inspire them to action. So I used a personal story in that of my days of training for triathlon and trying to build up my confidence and all of that stuff. So I would call it more of a true keynote talk.

Carol Cox:
Yeah. Inspirational, motivational, personal, story driven.

Diane Diaz:
Exactly.

Carol Cox:
Yes. Like taking your your personal story and personal lessons and then universalizing them universally.

Diane Diaz:
Yes, exactly. Exactly.

Carol Cox:
And then so I have on the calendar a keynote that I will be presenting at a conference in January 2022 in person, boy.

Diane Diaz:
Oh, my goodness.

Carol Cox:
Well, so this particular conference was planning on doing it and I think October of 2020 and then obviously had to shift it. And so they ended up doing a virtual, but they changed up like what they were going to do for the events of the interviews and then virtually and then they put back on the calendar for January 2022. So looking forward to that.

Diane Diaz:
Wow. Plenty of time to plan.

Carol Cox:
Oh, that's so funny because we were talking earlier today with with our our other coaches in the Thought Leader Academy memory feedback and Joy Spencer and about how, how different each of us is as far as how much we like to plan. Like I love the adrenaline of short timelines because give me the year for the keynote and it will still be November, December and I will be starting on it.

Diane Diaz:
I was going to say, you're not going I would be starting on it now for 2022. You're going to wait until what's. It's in January. You'll work during my break.

Carol Cox:
During the holiday break, right. Well, I do my best work in constraints. Yeah. You know, that's other people do their best work, like with expansiveness. Yeah. So as long as we know what it is.

Diane Diaz:
Absolutely.

Carol Cox:
So that leaves leads us to our fourth type of talk, which is a TEDx style talk and which I also call like a big idea talk and like a keynote. It's personal story driven. So it is, but it's also related to like, what is this big idea? What is something new that you can share with the audience that they haven't thought about before? Something counterintuitive or just something that, like you have research on or you have experience on, that you've taken this journey of discovery for yourself and you want to share what you've discovered with your audience. Unlike most keynotes, because most keynotes tend to be like the 25 to 45 minutes length of time. So you have a decent amount of time for your content for TED talks, TEDx style talks, they're like 10 to 12 minutes and that doesn't seem like a lot of time. So there definitely has you have to be very clear on your throughline and keep everything very focused on the main points that you're making. You don't have space to kind of like go off on different branches of the tree, so to speak, very, very tight. But that length of time and that format makes those talks so incredibly powerful and impactful, I would say even more so than a traditional 45 minute keynote.

Diane Diaz:
I agree. And actually, it just dawned on me it's TED talks are not unlike when a comedian does what they call like a tight 10 minutes. So if you watch any good comedian, I went to see Jim Gaffigan. Now, of course, he it was a longer show because it was a whole show at the local performing arts center. But when you see a comedian on for a tight 10 minutes, there's a through line in their whole set. Right. And then they usually bring it back around at the end and make a callback to something they did. I think a TED talk is very similar to that in the speaking world. Ted is. Almost like a comedian's ten minute set, right?

Carol Cox:
Oh, I love that. So I don't have to go write my own standup like I can just like, do this, like, do the same thing, but do it in a speech instead. That would be so much better. Sure. Okay. Well, I have a I have a friend, a good friend of mine, Laura Gallagher. She's been on the podcast a couple of times and she's done improv, like we've done the improv classes. Then she took a stand up comedy class about a year and a half ago, and she actually liked it better than The Improv because she could write it and prepare it ahead of time versus what we had to do.

Diane Diaz:
I think I would like it better too. Yeah, yeah. Because you can you can make the connections with everything and it's all tied together. Yeah.

Carol Cox:
Yeah. So maybe we'll do that next.

Diane Diaz:
We'll see. We'll see.

Carol Cox:
Well, we think we're funny.

Diane Diaz:
Yeah, well, I think I'm hilarious.

Carol Cox:
You see our text messages to each other. All right, so back to the TEDx style talks. And so I was I was just on a coaching call today with one of the women in our Thought Leader Academy, Tanya Bosa. She's a professor of sociology, and she has a TEDx talk that's coming up in January. So January 2021. So we were working through her script. Fascinating topic on the connection between disinvestment in black neighborhoods and then gentrification that happens like a decade or so or generations later in the connection between those. So she's going to be on this podcast in February 2021 after she does her talk so she can talk about how it went and the preparation for it. But again, like Big Idea and her personal story of where she grew up in Washington, DC is an integral part of her talk as well, because you want a personal connection when you're doing a test, all talk. You don't want to just like pick a random research topic and do it because the audience wants to know like, well, why does this matter to you as the person who's sharing this particular topic? This is the also the style. This this TEDx style. Ten minute talk is what we use for the virtual summit that we held this past October with the speakers who were there. And again, I still hear from women who attended. Now we're in December, so we're like two months later who still email me and tell me what an amazing experience that was for them, again, virtually on their laptops watching this and how engaged they were for four or five, 6 hours straight.

Diane Diaz:
Yeah, I think that speaks to the power of that TEDx style talk, because I don't think I don't think anybody would say that they've been that inspired by a 25 minute, 45 minute talk because these are you by keeping it tight, the impact is so much bigger. I think when anything is concise and clear, the impact is so much bigger.

Carol Cox:
Yes. And this is what we're going to be doing for the next virtual summit that will be holding April 1st, 2021. So we're keeping the same format of the type of talk. And then we're going to add more opportunities for audience interaction so that the audience can chat with each other more and talk with each other and more. So super excited about that. If you're not on our email list yet, make sure to do so so that you don't miss. As we start announcing more details about the summit, including our call for speakers, which we'll be doing in January. So to get on the email list, go to speaking your brand slash join again the speaking, your brand join and you can get on the list there. I attended virtually the TED Women Conference they held in November 2020. So not too long ago, and I have not tended attended the in-person version of their conference. This is the first one that I've done, but they had a variety of speakers who were actually from all over the world. So different women, different types of topics. They most of their talks were pre-recorded I think because of the time zone issues, because they literally had women from Australia and Asia, Africa like all over the place. Our speakers delivered all of their lives. None of them were pre-recorded because we liked the live aspect, but they also. So TEDx women also did short talks under 10 minutes as well, definitely kept the pace moving of the conference. They similar to us, they had speaker panels afterwards which were live. So they did it live where the speaker would come in and then we could interact with them or ask them questions from that. So that was really it was nice to see kind of how they had set it up and how similar it was to how we ended up setting up the summit that we did in October.

Diane Diaz:
That's really cool.

Carol Cox:
And they had some fun again, some fun audience apps that they used. So I was like taking notes like, Oh, they're using this nap, they're using this app, so we'll be maybe bringing some of those in. So those are the four talks for you to think about as you're going into 2021 to create for yourself so that you have things ready to go. When you get that speaking invitation, you want to do a webinar for your audience. Maybe you end up doing a test talk, maybe you end up applying to speak at. Our summit. So you'll have your signature talk, which you can use for lead generation and brand awareness, whether it's to your audience or to other people's audience. You have your webinar, which you can use for selling primarily to your own audience. So you have your audience and you're getting them to your webinar. The third type is the keynote, the keynote style talk, which generally is when a conference or an event comes to you and invites you to be a keynote speaker. And then you have the TEDx style talk, which again I would recommend working on whether you have an idea of to do a TED talk or not.

Carol Cox:
It's really is a great exercise to go through to work on all of these. So this is what the women in our Thought Leader Academy are working on right now. If you're interested in getting more information about working with us, whether it's one on one or when our Thought Leader Academy opens again, you can do that by going to our website, speaking your brand. Go to the Leader Academy page to sign up for the interest list and there's some more details on there. We also invite you to schedule a consult, call. You can talk with me or you can talk with Diane. And we do not bite like we do not we do not pressure you. We really like we just love to talk to women entrepreneurs here, what you're doing here, what your goals are here, what you want to do, speaking and visibility wise, and then how we can potentially help you with that. So we welcome you to schedule a consultation call with us. Diane, what are you looking forward to for 2021?

Diane Diaz:
So many things and a vaccine.

Carol Cox:
Top of the list.

Diane Diaz:
I just wanted a vaccine for Christmas, but I'm I'm looking forward to our upcoming summit. I loved the summit this year and I know it was our first one and I think we knocked it out of the park, frankly. But I'm excited to see where we take that for the coming year and improve upon what we did this past summit. So I'm super excited about that. And honestly, I'm excited with seeing where the women in the Thought Leader Academy. We have some amazing women in the Thought Leader Academy. They're top. They're amazing. Their topics are amazing. The work they do is, I mean, impacting people in the world. So I'm excited to see where they go with the, the, this idea of their thought leadership message and container and where they take that. So I'm just kind of I'm excited about seeing that unfold. So that's just fun.

Carol Cox:
We just live vicariously through them totally.

Diane Diaz:
And what they're doing. Yes. Yeah, absolutely.

Carol Cox:
So if you're enjoying this podcast, I would love it for you to leave a rating and review on Apple podcast because it helps more incredible women like you to find us. Next episode, we are going to be talking about trends in public speaking and trends and thought leadership. So I'm going to share with you all what the trends were back when I did the Trends episode in early January 2020. And surprisingly, those trends still hold even with everything that got disrupted, especially in person speaking wise. So you can go back now if you want to and catch up on that episode, or you can wait until next week and I'll share with you the 2020 trends and then what I see coming for 2021.

Diane Diaz:
Fine.

Carol Cox:
Diane, thank you so much for coming on the podcast.

Diane Diaz:
Thank you, Carol. It was fun.

Carol Cox:
Until next time. Thanks for listening.

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