Getting Buy-In from Your Audience on Your Message: Live Signature Talks from Our Thought Leader Academy Grads: Podcast Ep. 394

Getting Buy-In from Your Audience on Your Message: Live Signature Talks from Our Thought Leader Academy Grads: Podcast Ep. 394

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The essence of persuasive communication is about getting your audience on board with your ideas. 

But, it’s not about throwing out facts or making logical points; it requires connecting with your audience on an emotional level, understanding their needs and concerns, and addressing them effectively. 

By sharing personal stories, using relatable examples, and demonstrating genuine passion and authenticity, you create a sense of trust and rapport.

This is exactly what our Thought Leader Academy grads do in their signature talks! 

You’ll hear two of our recent grads, Angela Crawford and Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez, deliver a 10-minute version of the signature talk they created with us, so you can see and hear them in action.

We also have a roundtable discussion about what they’ve learned from being in the Thought Leader Academy and what’s next for them as speakers and thought leaders.

Angela Crawford is a vegan transformation coach and educator. Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez is the founder of Walking Tree, which works with companies on sustainability and green tech.

This audio is from a live broadcast we did on May 22, 2024. You can watch the video at https://youtube.com/live/UPUMGsAjRV8.

About Us: The Speaking Your Brand podcast is hosted by Carol Cox. At Speaking Your Brand, we help women entrepreneurs and professionals clarify their brand message and story, create their signature talks, and develop their thought leadership platforms. Our mission is to get more women in positions of influence and power because it’s through women’s stories, voices, and visibility that we challenge the status quo and change existing systems. Check out our coaching programs at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com

Links:

Show notes at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/394/ 

Video from the live show: https://youtube.com/live/UPUMGsAjRV8

Discover your Speaker Archetype by taking our free quiz at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/quiz/

Enroll in our Thought Leader Academy: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/academy/ 

Connect on LinkedIn:

394-SYB-TLA-Clients.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

394-SYB-TLA-Clients.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Carol Cox:
How do you buy in from your audience on your message? You’re going to hear two of our recent Thought Leader Academy grads deliver ten minute versions of their signature talks on this episode of the Speaking Your Brand podcast. More and more women are making an impact by starting businesses, running for office and speaking up for what matters. With my background as a TV political analyst, entrepreneur and speaker, I interview and coach purpose driven women to shape their brands, grow their companies, and become recognized as influencers in their field. This is speaking your brand, your place to learn how to persuasively communicate your message to your audience. Hi and welcome to backstage with Speaking Your Brand. I’m your host, Carol Cox. Today we have two of our recent Thought Leader Academy graduates who are going to share a ten minute version of their brand new signature talks that they created with us over the last eight weeks. This is the first LinkedIn live that we’re doing with two of them. Next week, we’re doing another LinkedIn live that will be hosted by our lead speaking coach, Diane Diaz, with our other two recent Thought Leaders Academy grads. If you’ve ever wondered how to get buy in from your audience, especially around a topic that they may not necessarily have been waving their hands to feel about, then you’re going to really appreciate this LinkedIn live and hearing their talks. We know that to be a persuasive communicator, you have to understand where your audience is, where they’re coming from, what they want from themselves, and how you can help them to get what they want, even if it may not be exactly what you want or as quickly as you would like.

Carol Cox:
So that’s what you’re going to hear as we walk through these ten minute versions of their signature talks. And then at the end, we’re going to have a round table discussion about what their experience was like creating them, working with us in the Thought Leader Academy and what’s next for them as speakers and as thought leaders. We have Angela Crawford, who’s a vegan coach and educator, and we also have Eloisa marquez Gonzalez, who is the founder of Walking Tree, who works with companies on sustainability and green tech. So here we have vegan lifestyle and we have green tech and climate change. Again, things that not necessarily everyone is jumping up and down to to hear about except for me, like I’m the one who would be in your audience is very willingly, but we know how important these messages are for more and more people to hear. So that’s why I am so happy that you are out there delivering these message messages on behalf of the important work that you’re doing. So we’re going to just kick it off right now. First up we have Angela. Angela. You ready?

Angela Crawford:
Yeah. Ready to go.

Carol Cox:
All right, let’s do it.

Angela Crawford:
Well, I am thrilled to be here presenting about the power of plants for transforming our mind, body and spirit. So we’ve all been told that we should eat our veggies. You’ve probably heard it like I did growing up from your parents or grandparents, and the United States Department of Agriculture recommends that we eat 5 to 9 servings of fruits and veggies each day. But what statistics find that we actually eat is less than two and a half cups per day, and a lot of that the more processed, unhealthy versions. So I invite you to think about what is your intake of plant foods on a regular basis? Where do you fall on the spectrum? And let’s expand beyond fruits and veggies to include all foods from the plant kingdom beans, lentils and other legumes, grains, mushrooms, nuts and seeds, and all the different foods made from these. Where do you fall on that continuum of plant based eating? If you find that you don’t eat as many or not that high of an intake, you’re not alone. Statistics find that the average American consumes most of their food from processed foods, followed by animal based foods, and only a small percentage from plant foods. Now in full disclosure here. As you may have guessed from the introduction, where I fall on that plant based continuum at this point in my life is that I’m fully plant based. I became vegetarian about 17 years ago and vegan about five years ago. But before you run out of the talk thinking, oh, you know, she’s going to go on about veganism and try to convert me, I want to reassure you that that’s not actually the focus of the talk.

Angela Crawford:
However, I will expect you to sign the vegan pledge before my talk is over. For those of you who are Star Trek fans. So in all seriousness, I know that if you’re like most of us, you may have goals for better mind, body, and spirit wellness. You may want to just be healthier, have more energy. You may hope to prevent future medical issues from coming on, or help to heal ones that you already struggle with. Maybe you want to inspire your loved ones to make healthier choices, or you just want to feel better emotionally, mentally, spiritually. At the same time, things sometimes get in the way of our goals. And so you might find that between conflicting messages about what’s healthy to eat, that we always are getting in the media, or being too overwhelmed or busy to make, you know, changes or to actually integrate healthy new nutrition in your life. Or maybe it just feels like nothing really makes a difference. Or you have these favorite foods or habits that you know are not healthy, but you don’t want to give them up. I can relate personally and professionally to all of those struggles. I’ve been a psychologist for over 25 years and until recently, for most of that time I worked as a psychotherapist. I helped my clients heal from trauma and stress and to deal with chronic medical conditions. And I was always passionate about holistic wellbeing and tried to integrate that into my own life and help my clients with that as well.

Angela Crawford:
And at the same time, I didn’t have the healthiest eating habits for so many years. I ate what was comforting, convenient, tasty, and I definitely had a chocolate addiction. I’d heard I should eat more fruits and vegetables, and sometimes I did, but often it was the foods that gave me the big dopamine boost that one out. Several years ago, I happened to go to a conference where they served plant based meals and the food was so delicious I started to see like, hmm, this could be a possibility. I can understand more how people might eat this way. I thought if only I had a personal chef, I could probably do this, but I didn’t have one. And so after the conference, I continued eating the way that was convenient and comforting. But only a few months after that conference, I had what I think of as a light bulb moment, sort of an awakening experience. I happen to be watching a program on PBS, and they featured a segment about workers in meat processing plants, and these workers had frequent injuries due to the repetitive and often dangerous nature of the work they were doing. And the program featured how their employer was discouraging them from seeking treatment or taking time off work or reporting their injury, or they were at risk of losing their job and their livelihood. Many of the workers were immigrants and felt they had few other choices. Seeing this program, even though it didn’t really show a lot of details of the actual meat processing plant, it opened my eyes to think more about how my food got to me.

Angela Crawford:
For the first time in my life, I started to consider the process by which my food was produced, and I was really distressed by how the workers were treated. And that got me thinking. If I don’t like how the workers are treated, what do I think about how the animals are treated? I had grown up in the Midwest, and what I saw were the cows grazing in the field. I had no awareness about industrialized animal agriculture. Or factory farming, which is now what produces 98% or more of the meat and dairy that we consume. That program got me thinking. And so the very next day, I bought my first vegetarian cookbook and made my first plant based recipe intentionally. It was a red pepper artichoke and spinach lasagna and it was delicious. I had to go out and buy new pots and pans while I was cooking, because I hadn’t been a cook before then, but it started me on a journey where I began cooking plant based meals each week, and I started to read all the books I could about plant based living, and I learned about the ethical impacts of our food choices, the devastating effects that animal agriculture is having on the environment, and also the healing power of plant based eating for reversing and helping to prevent many chronic medical conditions. And I myself was experiencing some improvements in my health and well-being and just feeling more fulfilled.

Angela Crawford:
It became a passion for me. And I realized that the way I had seen healthy lifestyle and plant based eating before was as depriving an all or nothing kind of choice. Either I do not do it all or don’t do anything at all, or just too difficult. And what I came to see was how everything is connected. I came to see how my food choices could affect my well-being and mind, body and spirit. I came to see how they also affected other things I cared about, like animals, other people, the planet. And realizing how this was interconnected actually made things simpler for me rather than overwhelming me. I found that when I connected with a strong why a reason why to make a change, it helped make the how so much easier and adventure rather than a chore. My experience led me to go on to do some research for a book, and I interviewed and surveyed people who were on a fully plant based vegan diet, explored how their lifestyle has affected their lives emotionally, physically, spiritually. And what I found were that the majority of those I interviewed and surveyed had what I call seven pillars of transformation that were part of their experience, and alignment with values was the core pillar that all the others rested on. And so I used that as an acronym, this first pillar of values to describe the other six, to make it easier to remember. And those other six pillars are vision, having a vision for a better life and a better world.

Angela Crawford:
Authentic fulfillment, love, or meaningful connections. Unity, which is our our interconnectedness with nature and all of life, and just realizing the truth of that. Expanding our circle of empathy and compassion to include ourselves, others, and all sentient beings. And lastly, self-empowerment, empowerment over our health, realizing that we have more impact over our health and well-being than we’ve ever been taught to believe. In future talks, I will expand on these and describe them in more depth and share examples of them and how each of us can integrate these into our life. But for the purposes of today’s shorter talk, I’m just going to invite you to reflect based on what I’ve shared, what’s one step that you can take? Maybe it’s simply to put more fruits and vegetables on your plate. Maybe you might swap beans instead of beef a few times a week. Maybe you might take one of your favorite recipes and Google a plant based alternative to it. There’s always an option that you can try that can taste really great. Or maybe you just want to do a little bit of research on your own of anything I mentioned today that made you curious. I’m going to leave you with a quote from Jane Goodall, primatologist, protector of chimpanzees and the environment, and also a plant based eater for several years. And she reminds us that what you make, what you do, makes a difference. And you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make for your life and beyond. Thank you.

Carol Cox:
Thank you so much, Angela. That was fantastic. I, I love listening to you talk because you have such a warm and soothing delivery and, and the presentations that you do, and I just kind of I just want to have you keep telling me all these wonderful things. And that is what I’m going to ask you this, and then we’ll come back to this and the roundtable after Eloisa does her presentation, is that I remember when you first started the Thought Leader Academy, you expressed that one of your concerns was you wanted to make sure that when you did these presentations to audiences, that you didn’t want them to feel like you were lecturing to them or evangelizing to them or judging them or anything like that. And so how do you feel about the talk that you’ve come up with?

Angela Crawford:
Um, I actually feel really good about it. Um, my, my VIP day with Diane, um, shed a lot of insight into ways to meet people wherever they are. And I think, like, knowing that I could speak to a range of different audiences and share a message in a way that can speak to whatever the needs of that audience might be. So it felt good.

Carol Cox:
Yeah, I feel like you, you know, you meet them where they’re where they’re at, which I mentioned in the intro, and you very much are about here’s how, here’s what your journey look like. And it’s almost like, you know, you’re extending an, an invitation at hand to say, you know, if you would like to learn more or pick this up here, you can. But if you if this is not the right time, that’s okay too. That’s what it feels like to me. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Okay. Well done. Angela. Yes, your slides are beautiful. And for those of you, if you happen to be listening on the podcast instead of on the LinkedIn live, you can actually watch the video either on LinkedIn or on YouTube. Links are in the show notes for this podcast episode. If you would like to see the video with the slides. Next up we have Eloisa marquez Gonzalez, who as I mentioned, is the founder of Walking Tree. She works with companies on sustainability in green tech. Eloisa, you’re up.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
Hello. Thank you and good afternoon and good morning, depending on where you’re joining us from. I’m Eloisa marquez Gonzalez. And we’ll be talking today about the walking tree approach. Has anyone gone ever ziplining? It’s so much fun. If you’re not afraid of heights. So I had the fortune of going with my family to Costa Rica a couple of years ago. And uh, before I left, I was looking for a new name for my brand, for my company. The former name was just not really, uh, not working out. It was too long. Really? Didn’t mean, uh, didn’t stand for what, uh, means what we stood for or met our goals. So I was looking for something new. And I went through a very systematic approach for branding and naming and came up with about ten different options. Before we went on the trip, I decided to leave this options marinade and I will pick the the winner. When I came back. Now for my business. I have some goals, and I wanted this name to reflect those goals, to reflect what we stand for, to reflect our mission. I know you have goals. Maybe it’s to bring innovation to meet your revenue goals, or just to have a greater impact on our planet and society. However, when we’re trying to achieve our goals, many times we hit obstacles. You might just be having to wearing too many hats, having changing priorities, or trying the latest tool out there and you just not working. It’s actually getting in the way.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
I anyone? Does it ring a bell? Well, I totally understand. I’ve been there, I’ve seen it. And as a trained engineer that has been incorporated and now consults for green tech organizations trying to improve their business performance. I’ve seen it. I understand, I’ve seen all these obstacles. And through my years of consulting, what I have noticed is that these obstacles will be there. However, there’s something bigger missing, and that is intentionality. Intentionality in creating processes and structures that help you and your team proactively approach and deal with these obstacles to get better outcomes and also have a greater impact on the environment and society. The obstacles will be there. Is how we deal with them. Now. Have you heard of the Maturity Matrix? If you haven’t, it’s okay. The Maturity Matrix is a framework that helps you evaluate your your company’s capabilities. Can your company repeatedly deliver the same level of service, the same level of quality? And there is five levels in this framework. Number one is is ad hoc. And usually this is where this is where companies that, uh, just come in every day and try to do their best to deal with the tasks. There’s no real way, standard way of doing things. Your employees just come in, get things done, however it’s best for them. Then we have the second level, which you have some basic processes, but there’s still not standardization. Not everyone does the same things, the things the same way. On the other side of the of the range, we have number four, which is measured here.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
We have standard processes, and these companies are already measuring the health of their processes or measuring how the processes are working for them. And then number five, if optimized, these are the data driven companies. They make decisions using the information they capture from their um, from their operations, from their customers. And they have a continuous improvement process. Now I’m going to ask you to think for a moment. Where does your company stand? You don’t have to put it in the comments. No need to to tell others where you are. Just think about it. If you fell on number 1 or 2, don’t worry, 65% of the companies out there are at this level. Back in 2002, there was a study done that was published at PMI, the Project Management Institute, and it found that 65% of companies fall on this area of number one and two. Ad hoc or they have some basic processes. Then ten years later, in 2012, the Lloyd. Did another study and surprise, surprise, it was again 65% of the companies. And because this is reality doesn’t mean that it has to be this way. There’s a better way. That is why I developed the Operations Optimization Roadmap to help organizations develop, develop clear structures, clear processes to achieve their goals, deal with obstacles, and have the impact that they desire in our environment and society. It is composed of four stages. The first one is the, um, organizational clarity.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
Do you have the clarity of what your mission is? What are your values? What are your goals? This becomes the North Star for decision making for you and your team. Then we have rapid alignment. And I’m not talking about alignment of bringing your team in once a year. Get them in the room and then just send them out for a year and see them in 12 months. This is about having structure to bring alignment throughout the year, making sure that everyone knows how things are shifting inside the company or outside the company. Now that you have your North Star, your alignment now, are you having efficient processes? Are you doing things the most effective and efficient way possible? And are these activities having the impact that you expect that you are trying to have in the world? And then we have adaptive agility, which is being proactive, being proactive about decision making, being proactive about the shifts that you make is not about only about what happens with the external factors, but about making decisions with the information that you have and making an organized shift as needed. So with this, uh, operations optimization roadmap, you can develop this clear structure for your company to work in a more organized manner. And in other talks, I will go in more detail. But for now, remember, once you have your operation optimized, then you can forget about having to firefight every time. And also you can forget about your team just throwing deliverables over the fence and hoping the next team is going to catch those deliverables in.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
Know what to do with them. Instead, you’re going to have an organized operation optimize operation that can adjust in an organized fashion to any demands on an organization that has practices that match your mission of caring for the environment and for society. Now, I want you to imagine the next week you get this amazing opportunity. The opportunity you were waiting for that’s going to make such a big difference in your business. And how would it feel to be able to say yes to that opportunity? Because, you know, you have an optimized, adaptive organization that will deliver the best outcome possible. They will nail the delivery. So I want to challenge you in two ways today. The first challenge is going to be easy. I want you to go back to your desk and pull out your mission statement for your company. If you have one. And look at it and think, does it still stand? Does it still stand for what you want to do today, where you’re going? Have you shared with your team? If you haven’t, this is a perfect time to share it. The second challenge is it’s going to be a little bit harder, but try it. And it’s about looking at your supply chain, about all the processes that are needed for servicing your customers, for developing your product. And in this case, just just take the initial portion. And think about those processes. Are those processes designed and set up in a way they’re going to help your employees do their best work.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
Are those processes going to set up your employees, your team and your customers for success? Now. Do you remember my story about ziplining? Well, when we arrive to one of the platforms, there was this amazing sea of trees that had all the roots outside of the ground. So amazed by what I was looking at. I asked my guide, what are these trees? And to my surprise, they were called Walkin Trees. These trees move every year, 2 or 3ft in search of sunlight and minerals. And that is when I realize that these trees were intentional about the way they grow, about the way they move. So that is how I decided that Walking Tree was going to be the name for my organization. Because we help businesses develop strong foundations like a tree. But with the adaptability of a walking tree. So I wondered for a second to think what these walking trips mean for you and your organization. How does the intentionality that this walk in trees bring to the way they grow means to you? And I want to close today with a quote from Arianna Huffington. We think, mistakenly, that success is a result of the amount of time we put in at work. Instead of the quality of the time we put in. And this comes back down to intentionality in the way that we design our processes and systems in our organization. Thank you.

Carol Cox:
Well done Eloisa. That was fantastic. I love the walking tree photo again, for those of you who are just listening on the podcast, you just have to come find the spot in the video where she shows the slide of the walk literally walking trees. I had never heard of them before, never seen them before and they are so cool. And I love how you tied the end of finding a name for your company to the beginning. With the story of ziplining and going to Costa Rica. How did that feel?

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
Amazing. It was. It was great. Yeah, it was great to be able to share the story and the knowledge and be able to, um, because everything is connected. It’s what we do at work is connected with who we are. And it’s very, um, it’s very neat to be able to interconnect and share that, that, uh, connection in our talks. So, um.

Carol Cox:
Yes. Well, and we’re gonna, we’re gonna dive more into that now. So Angela and Eloisa, you, as I mentioned, at the top, you just completed our thought Leader Academy. We just had our graduation call. And one of the things that we talked about during the Thought Leader Academy is, you know, this idea of getting buy in from your audience, through empathizing with them and through validating what they’re, what they’re already experiencing or what their goals are. And both of you did that beautifully in your talks. The other thing we talked quite a bit about is using humor. And so obviously, Eloisa, you had that in your talk with some of the funny, uh, memes, the funny GIFs about, you know, feeling like everything’s on fire at work or things just are just, you know, getting thrown left and right. And, Angela, you had humor and your talk as well with the resistance is futile signing the vegan pledge. So with that, you know, thinking back to the presentations that you’ve delivered in the past, you know, how have you been intentional about incorporating humor and, you know, and how does that look to you going forward? Angela, I’ll start with you.

Angela Crawford:
Yeah, I think in the past I wasn’t always so mindful of that. Often I was giving a talk for a specific reason and. I don’t think I fully realized the benefits of integrating that. So definitely I’m going to be more mindful moving forward that somewhere you know, where it’s appropriate. There will be some humor. So definitely cool to realize that.

Carol Cox:
And Eloisa, what about you?

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
Same here. And especially when when I’m talking about technical topics, it’s sometimes it feels like you have to be dry like the topic, but it’s not uh, it’s not necessarily true because by bringing that humor, we are acknowledging our obstacles and challenges that we are hitting as we are trying to develop this technology or process, whatever you are doing, um, and it’s acknowledging that these things are there and it’s okay. It’s how we deal with it. So humor, uh, brings us together. Uh, definitely. Yeah.

Carol Cox:
Absolutely. Angela, let me go back to you and tell us about the VIP day that you had. I know you worked with our lead speaking coach, Diane Diaz, and you spent those three hours together to map out your signature talk from beginning to end, using our framework with all of the colorful post-it notes on it. What were your thoughts leading up to the VIP day? What did you expect, and then how did the process go for you?

Angela Crawford:
Leading up to it. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I had done a lot of the exercises that you had in the workbook, which helped lay the foundation for when I met with Diane. So I had my thoughts more clear. And, you know, I was hopeful that it would bring clarity, but I really was surprised at how much clarity it brought that very quickly through the questions she asked and then the post-it notes that my responses ended up on, it brought what felt like a lot of confusing, disparate ideas together into a focus and and then into that focus brought in elements that are important for having a meaningful talk. You know, again, things that I hadn’t always thought about before, the humor, making sure that there were ways to connect with the audience and engage the audience. So it wasn’t just me talking. And so that that whole process, it just, I don’t know, it brought, brought everything together in a way that I couldn’t have imagined. And then it also laid the foundation for future talks, because I can clearly see now how I can vary my larger signature talk based on who I’m speaking to or what the objective is of specific talk. So it was amazing.

Carol Cox:
Oh, fantastic. Yeah. We really, you know, our goal when we work with all of you and the Thought Leader Academy is we we want to get you to kind of think like us, think like us in the sense of how we approach creating presentations and doing public speaking and sharing the best practices and everything we’ve learned over the years, not only as speakers ourselves, but after working with so many speakers like yourself and Eloisa in your graduation speech. So we have each of the grads deliver a short three minute graduation speech using what they’ve learned and say you did your graduation speech, and it was so fun because you came up with an acronym. You’re a framework, so you definitely and you I could tell, you know, with you and all the rest of the women who we’ve worked with that you really learned and took in everything that we were teaching you. So can you give us an overview of that framework that you came up with with? Sure. So generously letting me borrow and use. And of course, I will give you credit for it.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
Yeah. So, uh, it was uh, in.

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
General, the, um, the Thought Leader Academy was an amazing experience because it shows how to put all these different pieces together when, um, in the past, it just felt kind of like I didn’t know how they fit. Like, if I was just making things up by putting them together. But you and Diane showed us how to, in a very elegant way to to streamline and combine things. And um, and the show, um, acronym, if I remember correctly. Now I’m forgetting, um, it was with, uh, show share your stories. The S stands for Share Your Stories. That helps you make a connection with, uh, your audience. Then the H stands for humor, which is just don’t be afraid to use humor. It’s always breaks the monotony. Then we have the O is to overview, not overwhelm. In the past, I would go into a lot of details because I thought I needed to give details and instead I would overwhelm my audience. So you have to give an overview instead of overwhelming. And then the W stands for weight. You need to learn to pause and let their audience, your audience, absorb what you’re saying.

Carol Cox:
Well done Eloise, to see the power of an acronym, because you remembered all four of those in a way that would probably have been much more difficult if you hadn’t put it into an acronym. So I love it. Thank you so much for sharing that. Louisa, let me ask you too, about why did you decide to enroll in the Thought Leader Academy? Where were you at earlier this year? And what? What led you to decide that this was something that you wanted to do?

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
So I have been doing already talks in the past, and but my topics have always been technical, and I always ended with a lot of facts and figures and and graphs and. I wasn’t sure how engaging I was being on my speeches or my talks, and I was looking to to become more of a speaker and have that more of a practice and have a more engaging, um, presentation. So by, by joining the The Thought Leader Academy, it helped me bring all these pieces together, understand how the structure should be, how to break down my story. For example, that was something that I thought it was, uh, magnificent that Diane helped me break my story and bookmark my talk with my story. In the past, I struggled to do that, and she was able to very elegantly do that, uh, bookmarking the story so it will make sense. So it would actually be memorable. So.

Carol Cox:
All right.

Carol Cox:
Fantastic. Angela, I know that you have a book that it is set to come out. And so tell us what is next for you as a speaker and as a as a thought leader.

Angela Crawford:
Yeah. Well, the book is coming out early next year. So in the months leading up to it and following it, coming out will definitely be doing podcasts, um, speaking engagements, um, at Veg Fest and other events and. And I think, you know, creating some workshops and trainings as well, and maybe some group coaching, even things like that. So.

Carol Cox:
Oh, good. Well, we’ll make sure to include links for both Angela and Eloisa in the show notes to their websites, as well as to their LinkedIn profile. So definitely make sure to connect with them there. And Eloisa, what about you? What’s next for you?

Eloisa Marquez-Gonzalez:
As I mentioned, I’m looking forward to, uh, doing more speaking engagements and sharing my knowledge, helping other, um, businesses, uh, improve their performance and also improve their impact on our world and society. So that’s that’s what it’s important for me. So.

Carol Cox:
Well, again, thank you both for doing the work, putting it in the hard work to create your signature talks and to put yourself out there as speakers to share these very important messages with your audiences. I am so proud of you, and I can’t wait to see all the big things that you’re going to do. So for those of you who are watching and listening, make sure to connect with us on LinkedIn. If you’re interested in joining our Thought Leader Academy, you can get all the details as speaking your Brand.com slash Academy again, that’s speaking your Brand.com slash academy. Until next time, thanks for listening.

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1 Comments

  1. Cindy Ojczyk on May 29, 2024 at 9:16 am

    Eloisa and Angela, you continue to inspire me! I learned a great deal with you in our time at the Thought Leader Academy and even more in these presentations. Your perseverance, professionalism and drive towards your goal was wonderfully present in these LinkedIn Live talks. Way to go!

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