Fabulous Facilitator Speaker Archetype with Susan Moe: Podcast Ep. 303

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This is the second episode in our series exploring the four speaker archetypes. (You can discover your archetype by taking our free quiz at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/quiz.)

Knowing your archetype will help you to:

  • Create more impactful and memorable presentations
  • Market yourself as a speaker using your strengths
  • Try our recommendations to take your talks to the next level

In this episode, we’re talking about the Fabulous Facilitator speaker archetype with my guest and Thought Leader Academy grad Susan Moe.

As a Fabulous Facilitator:

  • You’re a great teacher and listener and really good at helping people understand concepts and learn from each other.
  • You enjoy speaking to smaller groups in a workshop setting where you can encourage participation and dialogue.
  • Your empathetic nature allows you to identify connections among people. Rather than you being the provider of the solutions, you like to help people find the solutions together.
  • Your big challenge? You’re so inclined to give the floor to others that your audience misses out on the opportunity to learn more about you.

Susan and I talk about how she’s leveraged her strengths as a Fabulous Facilitator plus what she’s learned about the power of incorporating personal stories into her talks and the results so far.

Discover your Speaker Archetype by taking our free quiz: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/quiz.

About My Guest: Susan Moe is the founder of Ascended Presence, a coaching and training company that helps people live richer, more meaningful, and happier lives. Susan is an international clairvoyant reader, life coach, spiritual mentor, public speaker, and workshop facilitator. Through her readings and trainings, she empowers people to take ownership over their emotional well-being regardless of their external circumstances. Susan holds a Master’s degree in business from UC Irvine’s Paul Merage School of Business. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from California State University, Sacramento while having studied in Sweden her junior year at Uppsala University. She also graduated from CDM Spiritual Center’s advanced seminary program.

About Us: The Speaking Your Brand podcast is hosted by Carol Cox. At Speaking Your Brand, we help women entrepreneurs and professionals clarify their brand message and story, create their signature talks, and develop their thought leadership platforms. Our mission is to get more women in positions of influence and power because it’s through women’s stories, voices, and visibility that we challenge the status quo and change existing systems. Check out our coaching programs at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com

 

 

Links:

Show notes at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/303

Susan’s website: http://www.ascendedpresence.com/

Discover your Speaker Archetype by taking our free quiz: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/quiz/.

Join our Thought Leader Academy: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/academy/ 

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303-SYB-Susan-Moe.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

303-SYB-Susan-Moe.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Carol Cox:
What does it look like to be a fabulous facilitator? We’re talking about that speaker archetype with my guest, Susan Mo. On this episode of the Speaking Your Brand podcast. More and more women are making an impact by starting businesses running for office and speaking up for what matters. With my background as a TV political analyst, entrepreneur and speaker, I interview and coach purpose driven women to shape their brands, grow their companies and become recognized as influencers in their field. This is speaking your brand, your place to learn how to persuasively communicate your message to your audience. Hi there and welcome to the Speaking Your Brand podcast. I’m your host, Carol Cox. This is the second episode in the series we’re doing exploring the four speaker archetypes. Last week we looked at the stellar scholar archetype. Today we’re going to dive into the fabulous facilitator. If you haven’t yet taken our free quiz to find out which speaker archetype you are. You can do so by going to speaking your brand quiz. Again, that’s speaking your brand quiz. Knowing your archetype will help you to create more impactful and memorable presentations to position and market yourself as a speaker, leveraging your strengths and to take our recommendations so that you can take your talks to the next level. Today we’re talking about the fabulous facilitator speaker archetype with my guests and thought leader Academy graduate Susan Mo. Susan is the founder of Ascend Presents, a coaching and training company that helps people live richer, more meaningful and happier lives.

Carol Cox:
And Susan was on the podcast earlier this year in February, and she was in episode number 264, and a fascinating conversation we had about the role of symbols and metaphors in our stories. So definitely go back and listen to that. After you listen to today and Susan and I talk about how she’s leveraged her strengths as a fabulous facilitator, plus what she’s learned about the power of incorporating personal stories into her talks and the results that she’s had so far. If you’re a fabulous facilitator, you’re a great teacher and listener, and you’re really good at helping people understand concepts and learn from each other, you most likely enjoy speaking to smaller groups in a workshop setting where you can encourage participation and dialogue. Your empathetic nature allows you to identify connections among people rather than you being the provider of the solutions you like to help people find the solutions together. Your big challenge is that you’re so inclined to give the floor to others that your audience misses out on the opportunity to learn more about you. So this is why we’re talking about these different speaker archetypes in the series on the podcast, because I really want you to leverage the natural strengths you have as a speaker and as a communicator, but then making sure that you’re becoming a multi dimensional presenter. Again, take our free quiz at speaking your brand quiz so you can get your result. Now let’s get on with the show. Well, welcome back to the podcast, Susan.

Susan Moe:
Thank you. I’m so glad to be here.

Carol Cox:
I am too. And I say welcome back because you were speaking your brand podcast last in February of this year. So so not that long ago in episode 264, which was called the role of symbols and Metaphors in Our Stories. And that was such a great episode. I heard from a number of listeners how much they got out of that. I think, like surprisingly and unexpectedly, I don’t know if they knew what to expect going into an episode titled about the roles and some roles and symbols in our stories. And I think they got something very different, but something that they totally appreciated.

Susan Moe:
That’s so great to hear. That was a really fun conversation.

Carol Cox:
So for those of you who haven’t, listen, I’ll make sure to include a link in the show notes so you can go back and listen to that after you listen to our conversation today. So today, Susan and I are going to be talking about the speaker archetype result that Susan got when she took our speaker archetype quiz, which was the fabulous facilitator. And I hear from so many women who take the quiz that they’re not at all surprised by whatever result that they get. So there’s four different results Stellar scholar, fabulous facilitator, spellbinding storyteller and provocative performer. There’s no one that are good, better than any of the other ones. They all have their strengths. And that’s the whole point is like leaning into whatever your natural strengths are, and also then adopting some of the other strengths from some of the other archetypes to be more well rounded. Speaker That is the goal behind all of this. So we’re going to dig into the fabulous facilitator here today with Susan to talk about how this shows up in the work that she does in her own group, in community, and some of the things she’s learned by working with us here as speaking your brand. So, Susan, tell us what it is that you do in your business with the community that you run.

Susan Moe:
Well, I teach a monthly class. It’s a training, and we learn about how to develop your intuition and listen to it, how to manage your personal energy, relate to yourself as a spiritual being and all kinds of things like that. And what I found was that I was in true, fabulous facilitator mode. Is trying to pack in all the information. So each month ended up being like this master class. And what my students reflected back to me was the sessions that they enjoyed the most were the ones where I shared stories and examples of how I applied, what I was teaching them in my own personal life, which is exactly what you’re always sharing with us, is to share that bigger vision. The why, Why should they be learning these things? It’s not just enough to learn them, but how are they going to use them? And how can you share a picture of that?

Carol Cox:
Yes. And Suzanne, I appreciate that you talk about that. You really want to provide your clients, the community, the group that you host with a lot of value, with a lot of tangible things that they can learn and then they can use and they can apply. And that’s what we all want to do. And I feel like for those of us who have strengths in the facilitator area, we’re really good at kind of observing and being in tune with what our audience needs, what they’re looking for. That’s what facilitators do. Like we talk, I think in the last one, the last episode, Susan, that you were on about energy management, like understanding your own energy as a speaker, but then also the energy of the audience. And so as facilitators, I feel like we’re really good at doing that. But then I feel like also because you probably have this teaching background, whether we did teaching professionally or just have always enjoyed it. So that and what do teachers do the impart knowledge and information to the students, to the people at the other end? But then what is what is the downside of that?

Susan Moe:
That’s right. And one thing I don’t know if you have thought of it like this, but when I was taking the quiz, first of all, it nail on the head and I had some FOMO because I really wanted to be a storyteller. But I do love, love, love teaching because it’s so gratifying, right, When you see the people use what you have taught them and then they have this positive ripple effect. But also what I noticed was that I love learning. And so I’m drawn to the fabulous facilitator from both sides, from both the student and the teacher. So I’m like locked into that. And to be honest, I think I would have been happy staying as a fabulous facilitator for the rest of my life were it not for you and the Speaking your brand podcast, because one of the reasons why I joined the Thought Leader Academy was because you’re inspiring us to think bigger. And so that’s why I did that. And also I just realized that, you know what? We don’t have the luxury to just teach and learn anymore. And what I mean by that is like with our climate crisis, as you mentioned, it’s not even a climate crisis now, is it a climate emergency? And just like in our personal lives, when we’re in survival mode, we’re not going to spend time learning to in class about personal growth or marketing or finance. It just doesn’t matter. We don’t have the bandwidth for that. But in those crisis situations, we need to motivate people to actually act. And that’s that vision that you’re talking about, the why we need to learn these things.

Carol Cox:
Absolutely. And that’s where for the fabulous facilitator is that because the facilitators are so good at teaching and listening and helping people learn and kind of pull together concepts that kind of the other side of that, that facilitators don’t tend to do as much. And you mentioned this earlier, Susan is sharing your own stories, sharing your own personal stories and lessons like it’s almost like a distance between the material that you’re teaching and yourself. And that’s what teachers do. And like lecturers, professors, they maintain this kind of like professional distance, so to speak, between what they’re teaching and themselves. But what we find so much, especially just from learning, just if you think about theories of learning that when the students, the clients can understand your or hear your own personal stories, they actually put themselves in those stories as they’re listening to them. And it helps the learning to get absorbed even more so.

Susan Moe:
Absolutely. And this even goes back to our last conversation when we were talking about symbols. The stories paint a picture in our mind’s eye. And if you have been to you have been to a lot of lectures and presentations and things like that, and I bet you nine times out of ten, you remember the story. You remember the picture that was painted, not so much the content, or maybe at least you would be inspired to go back and review what the content was. But it’s so easy to remember the bigger vision, the why, that inspirational message.

Carol Cox:
So talk to me a little bit about as you’ve been developing this community that you host, how have you found it to be effective to integrate some of your own kind of personal stories and personal lessons? Like tangibly, what has that look like for you?

Susan Moe:
Well, at the beginning of each session, I say this is a trusted space and I will share lots of personal stories. And I also want you to be able to share your stories as well and trust it. That and that creates this, a sense of trust that, yeah, we can let. The wall come down and show that vulnerability so that we can make a connection with our audience and then also just create more of a movement like what you do with that interactive and not just the stage on a stage kind of a thing where you’re really breeding and connecting with the people. So I have found that to be so much more effective and meaningful for both me and the students in my classes.

Carol Cox:
And I like that. You mentioned about building this sense of trust, and I have found that whether you’re the host of a community or you’re a speaker in front of a group of people, that if you are the one who is willing to share a personal story and have that vulnerability, first, it creates that vulnerable, trusted space for the other people who are there with you, either in the virtual room or in the in-person room, because, as they say, vulnerability is contagious. But oftentimes as a speaker, you’re the leader and you have to go first, because if you haven’t built that trust with your audience, you can’t expect them to dig deep and share something that may be vulnerable for them if they’re not sure how it’s going to be received.

Susan Moe:
Absolutely. And we’re all you know, you talk about energy. We’re all walking around with this protective layer around ourselves, like, so that we can operate it in this very dynamic world. And so you actually have to do something to help bring that energetic wall down and help people open their hearts and connect. We’re all longing for that so much. And it’s not just reverberation from being closed off from the pandemic. This is just the way we are built as human beings is to connect with other people. But when we have those walls up and a lot of times that professional student or that perfection, like I have all the answers, that just creates more of a wall and a disconnect between those people that we’re actually trying to reach.

Carol Cox:
So, Suzanne, let’s talk a little bit about the speeches, the work that you’re doing speaking. Why since having gone through the leader academy. So when you were on the podcast in February, you hadn’t started the Thought Leader Academy yet. You started in March and you graduated in at the end of June. So you completed the four months with us there. And so we work together on your talk as we went through the program. So you originally I remember you started the Thought Leader Academy and you’re like, I have all these different ideas and I’m not sure which direction to go in, which is normal. We all have that because we all have different interests and different passions and different things we want to talk about. So we ended up settling on something that I think was was surprising to me. But in the best way of the message that you wanted to share with the people who would be in your audience. So before we get to that, what we ended up with, can you tell me, Susan, about where you originated from, really with your first passion business, which was one green smoothie?

Susan Moe:
That’s right. That’s right. I just am so passionate about this, the climate and the health of our planet that I just But what was happening is I would start these stories and I would just spiral out of control because there are so many different ways to approach that. And almost all of them make people shut down. So people don’t want want to hear that message. And then also, I am really interested in helping people discover themselves as spiritual beings, learning to trust their intuition. But it just seemed like when I started the Thought Leader Academy was that those are two very, very different topics and how could I merge them in a way that was meaningful and helpful?

Carol Cox:
We talked a little bit about this idea of you being so, so passionate about the climate crisis and whether that could be your talk. And it is hard. It’s like I’m vegan, I’ve been vegan for over ten years. I know we have women who come through the academy who also have a vegan message, and I am so appreciative of all the work that they do. But I also know having been in the vegan movement and being in the vegan education movement early on, that it’s hard. It’s hard for people in Rwanda to want to hear a message that they just like, I don’t have time for this. I’m busy, I have other things to do. I need to live my day to day life and I get it. Like I totally understand where they’re coming from. So we kind of took this idea of, you know, how where people are in their lives. And instead we kind of decided to come to it from a different angle. And this is in your audience in particular, Susan, that we had worked on was kind of women entrepreneurs in general. Is this idea of, you know, do you feel like you need to work on your business all the time that is your baby and that you feel really either happy or down depending on how your business is doing? And then and then you kind of took us on this journey of this idea of like energy management and understanding our energy and kind of getting out of being enmeshed in our businesses because that’s the struggle that you found yourself in and the very thing that you were passionate about.

Susan Moe:
Exactly. And what happens then is when we get enmeshed with our businesses or any big project or something that we’re working on, even a family is we then don’t have the bandwidth to have that bigger perspective, to have that broader consciousness that my actions impact. You and they impact other people. And so if we take our energy back, reclaim it to our own selves, that sort of fills us up. And then we create that bandwidth that we can go out into the world and create the changes that we want to see.

Carol Cox:
And so I feel like your message, Susan, is such a great example of taking what it is that we care about, but then also recognizing what is it that our audiences care about, what do they need, and kind of aligning our message and our purpose with them as well.

Susan Moe:
When it when you’re talking about energy management, that impacts not only your business, not only yourself, but all of your relationships, whether they’re business relationships or your personal relationships. And if there’s one thing that is going to knock you off your game is if you are having a conflict in a personal relationship that, like nothing else is such a distraction and it just prevents us, again, from being able to act in the way that we want to be loving and kind and compassionate and care about other people, not just our own little tiny world. I think that’s why it’s really important to be able to have that awareness of when we have our energy in our business, in our projects, in other people, and to be able to actively be able to call that back and create that separation of identity.

Carol Cox:
Hmm. This is probably a slightly different kind of definition or take on energy in addition to what it is that you just described about the energy management between you and another person or a group of people or the audience is that I have become much more aware, like intentionally aware of my energy levels either throughout the day or day to day or week to week, kind of depending on what’s going on around me, like the type of work that I’m doing. So like, I’m doing this type of work and it feels incredibly draining to me or I’m doing a different type of work and it feels really energizing and supportive to me. So am I, like totally going down a different direction when it comes to understanding energy a little bit.

Susan Moe:
A little bit. And and that’s that’s why this information is so important, because people think that it’s the physiology, the physical energy of your body. And what I’m talking about is kind of more of what you alluded to with understanding what your audience needs. So being able to tune into, are they are they getting low, are they stressed what’s happening energetically with like almost like your your inner energy? I think there is a little bit of a distinction, but it’s good to also have that that awareness of these tasks really drain me. So maybe I’m going to do them first thing and get them over with or those, those kinds of things. Sometimes we get really, really amped up when our business is going really well, or if our kid gets into a certain school or or something like that. And and then we get kind of low if things are, if it feels drudgery. So there’s a little bit of an overlap, to be honest.

Carol Cox:
And I recognize that. I definitely like feel that in my business, you know, day to day or week to week feeling kind of the ups and downs, depending on how things are going. And I have been trying to kind of see the silver lining in things. Maybe it does something doesn’t go the way that I had wanted it to or that I had expected it to or I maybe did, didn’t hit a certain goal that I had set for myself. And yes, like I may be disappointed in that for for a moment or or so, but then I always stop and say, okay, well, what is the good out of this? Like, what is okay? So maybe this opportunity didn’t come through, but then it makes room for maybe a future opportunity that could come through or this thing didn’t happen, but maybe it’s in something else will instead.

Susan Moe:
Oh, I love that question so much. And that’s looking for that silver lining or looking for the positive or something. That is a great first step, but it’s actually still in the head. So what we want to do is we want to grab that disappointment. We want to grab that energy wherever it’s residing in the body, and then to move it out so that we create some space to bring back in all of those energies that remind us, well, we’ve been through this before, we know something better is coming. But to actually create the space for that, if we just keep it in the head, very often the energy can kind of get buried in our little bodies. And pretty soon we’re like, Oh my God, my shoulder hurts, or I have a stomach ache or something like that. You can’t think your way into a better, better energetic. It’s almost like bypassing. You really got to move the energy.

Carol Cox:
Oh my gosh, is said. I feel very seen because I like to say I spend 99% of my life in my head.

Susan Moe:
There you go.

Carol Cox:
Truly, I do. And so when you just said that, I was like, oh, of course, that’s exactly what I do. And there’s no surprise there. But to your point, yes, like I need to get things out of my head and move them through. And honestly, like it is so like that. That idea to me sounds like learning how to do a salsa dance or something. I’m like, I don’t know. I don’t know what the steps are. I don’t know where to stand. Like, I don’t know what to do when the music comes on.

Susan Moe:
That’s right. Perfect timing for being the fabulous facilitator. Those steps to do the salsa dance, those steps to move the energy. That’s that’s anybody can learn that. Those are the very, very simple but powerful, energetic management techniques. But what you taught me in the Thought Leader Academy is the why. Why does it matter? Why is it a problem for you? I mean, you’ve spent your whole life, you’re super successful. Why Why should you change now? And that’s the difference. So that’s what you taught me? Oh, yeah.

Carol Cox:
That’s a good question. Why should I change now? I don’t. I don’t. I don’t know. Why is that? Is there a.

Susan Moe:
Reason? Yeah. Oh, lots of reasons. But one of the reasons is when you’re in your head, you’re in your body, and your body is not your soul. And so if you’re having a body perspective, you’re going to make decisions very, very, very differently than if you’re going to have that big picture spiritual perspective. And that, I guess, is the whole point of my signature talk that we came to is that when we’re all operating from our body perspective, we’re going to want to focus on the things that impact us. But when we have that spiritual perspective, that energetic wall comes down, we open our hearts and we want to do what’s best for the community, what’s best for the collective, what’s best for all people living on earth, all sentient beings, to be perfectly honest.

Carol Cox:
Oh, Susan, okay, that just gave me goosebumps. And that is so beautifully said. And I have been thinking as of the time of recording this right now, this is end of August, and I’ve been thinking quite a lot about this, that as a well, American society in particular, but this is applies to the West too, is we are so individualistic in our culture, right? Protestant work ethic, pull yourself up by your bootstraps. You don’t need any one made it on my own, right? That’s just like it is so enmeshed into our culture. It’s the water that we swim in that we don’t even know it. Of course, neoliberalism is like the ultimate pinnacle of individualistic, free market society, and I have been thinking so much lately that we really like as women leaders, as women entrepreneurs, as speakers, we really need to connect more with what benefits the collective, not just us individually, as as entrepreneurs, as leaders, as speakers. And I don’t know exactly what that looks like, but I’ve talked a lot about like a feminist approach to public speaking and kind of getting way away from this, like one way hierarchical kind of masculine approach to public speaking. And I really feel like the collective is such an important aspect of that.

Susan Moe:
Well, you said the magic words. You said, you see, you’re already intuiting it. We’re swimming in that water and just like a fish doesn’t even know what water is until it gets out. That’s what, what, what I’m trying to get across here is how do we extract ourselves from the Matrix so that we can see the water, we can see the problems. And even if you if you think about when you’re talking about public speaking, look at what Zelinski has done. He didn’t get bankers and seamstresses and people from all walks of life to rally around his his. He didn’t teach them. This is how we’re going to do the resistance. He brought them in through his vision of a resilient, strong, independent Ukraine. And he has the whole world pretty much is surrounding him with support. And he didn’t do that through teaching. He did that through sharing his vision. And what I think you’re doing with the Thought Leader Academy is how do we get more women sharing these messages of the collective matters? We all matter, right? Not not just as individuals. So I think you’re right on right on it. And I love the Thought Leader Academy because. Right. You inspired me. Get out of teaching share your wife gets because of the community for all of our sakes. I mean, we need it.

Carol Cox:
Yes. And to your point, like, we need women, progressive women in particular, to share this vision of what our society could look like because we see what has gone on for the past 5000, 200 years. We see where that’s gotten us. We see where it’s taking us in the near term, and we need better visions to be out there.

Susan Moe:
Absolutely. In fact, it was the very first thought that came into my head when I heard about Roe v Wade being overturned was this is exactly why we need the Thought Leader Academy. We I want to just duplicate this all over the world to inspire millions of people out there, not just protesting, but how do we make the change that we really need because we don’t have time to be trying to elect women into office and try to do protests and all that are good. But we need a really big grand vision, kind of like what Zelenskyy did under this emergency situation he was in when he was invaded.

Carol Cox:
So I love that. Yes. Okay. We are going to hold that and we are going to manifest that for sure. And we’re going to make that happen through our collective efforts. Such a great point. Let me ask you about your experience in the Thought Leader Academy. I mean, you’ve mentioned a few things, but as. Anything else you want to add?

Susan Moe:
Yeah. I think it’s important to invest in yourself if you want to be able to have the support and the structure to invest in others. And I think what when I talk about we needing more women, sharing their vision and their action and creating a catalyst for change. I think what’s great about the Thought Leader Academy is that you help bring clarity and the support and the structure. So you’re not just saying go and be a cheerleader and go out and do this. You do both. The tangible sort of scaffolding is what it feels like to support people along the journey, as well as providing the bigger picture vision. So I think that the two of those is really powerful. And of course, everybody always says the other women in the group, which is really fantastic. But I think for me, that combination of learning, but then your bigger picture, that vision of why this matters, why should I invest my money and my time and energy into doing this work? And I think that’s what I came away with was just a deep gratitude for that.

Carol Cox:
Oh, thank you so much for sharing that. All right, Susan. So our final questions to wrap up is what is a favorite book that you would recommend?

Susan Moe:
Well, you and I both share a love of reading, and so it’s really hard to pick just one. But since your audience really likes to listen to audio, I would recommend All We Can Save. It’s an anthology of short essays and poems by 60 women leaders in the climate movement, and the book itself is fantastic, but it’s narrated by actresses such as Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Jane Fonda and Janet Mock, among others. So it’s a it’s just such a great book for young and old and women and men, everybody. I really recommend that one.

Carol Cox:
Oh, okay. I’m looking for a good audiobook, so I will definitely check that one out. Thank you so much, Susan and favorite TED Talk.

Susan Moe:
So again, as much as I live, breathe all things metaphysics and spirituality, I’m also passionate about this health of our home, our earth. So my favorite woman, TEDx Talk is by Greta Thunberg from Sweden. And I love this one because she was just 16 years old and it was before she had stepped into the leader she has become today. So she’s so, so, so nervous and yet incredibly courageous to speak with absolute blistering honesty about how our leaders have failed us in our climate emergency. And what’s interesting is that this speech has been viewed more than 3 million times, and it helped her galvanize millions of young people around the world to protest this lack of action by our political leaders. And you, Carol, always say that one person’s voice can make a difference. And this TED talk is proof, because the very next year after she gave this speech, Greta was named Time Person of the Year for public speaking matters. And it can make a huge impact.

Carol Cox:
Absolutely. Yes. Oh, love that, Susan. Thank you. And what a great description of how that has impacted the movement. All right.

Susan Moe:
And favorite quote, one of my favorites is this one. And it says it’s one of the popular ones by Maya Angelou. Do the best you can until you know better. And then when you know better, do better. And I like this quote because it reminds us that most of us are doing the best that we can with the education and experience that we have at the time. But if we lean into broadening our consciousness and seeing that bigger picture, then it behooves us to update our behaviors and our thoughts and beliefs rather than just default to, well, that’s the way it’s always done it, or that’s just the way it is. That’s just lazy. And Maya, she’s beseeching us to get out of our comfort zone, lean into learning new things, and then to level up those thoughts and behaviors. And we as individuals need to grow before we can have any hope that our society will grow up to the maturity level where we need it to be, where we want to take care of one another rather than compete with one another. I mean, we saw that with all the the race riots in the and the Black Lives Matter protests. I learned so much from that and have changed and learn. And with the climate and veganism and and all these things, we really do want to continually update and broaden our understanding of how things work.

Carol Cox:
Yes. And I always and I always like to kind of talking with her to a podcast audience or to an audience in person is to invite them to take the journey if they so desire or to invite them to take the journey when they’re ready versus a like reprimanding. You’re doing it wrong. And I know better because we know that that does not work.

Susan Moe:
Yes, Yes. I to be honest, I think you do such a good job of welcoming people into your world, into the academy. You are very, very compassionate when we first come to you and all of us are like, Oh my God, I have no idea what I’m doing again. And you’re just so relaxed and really welcoming. So anyone. Aid of the lovely Carole Cox. You need not be.

Carol Cox:
Please. I am far from perfect. And is that imperfection that gives me a lot of compassion because we’re all like, we’re all just doing our we’re all doing our best. We care about what we care about and we want to make a difference. So I would love listeners to find out where they can best connect with you and to tell them also, in addition to the community, you also do one on one work.

Susan Moe:
Yes. So I teach the monthly training, which is a practicum. It’s really hands on and experiential, but I also do one on one clairvoyant or psychic readings for people and coaching, which is just really energetic coaching for life changes. There’s really the sweet spot there. So and I have a newsletter and this free community where we have a book club talking about really meaningful things. So lots happening and you can find everything at Ascended Presents dot com. And if anyone is interested in learning more about how to increase presence, which is one of the ways that you increase your intuition, there’s a five day guide on my website that free that people can can log in and get just some very practical, easy but powerful tips and tricks on how to increase their presence and their intuition.

Carol Cox:
Fantastic. So ascended presents dot com Make sure you all go there. And then if you would like to take the speaker archetype quiz that we have, if you haven’t yet taken it, you can go to speaking your brand quiz. Thank you so much for coming back on the Speaking your Brand podcast. Susan Thank you so much for being such a valued member of our speaking your brand community and I cannot wait to see you in February in Orlando, Florida, for our in-person speaking intensive. It’s going to be so much fun.

Susan Moe:
I’m super excited. Thank you so much.

Carol Cox:
We’re continuing our series about the speaker archetypes. Next week, we’re going to look at the provocative performer. So make sure to hit, subscribe or follow in your podcast app so you don’t miss any future episodes until next time. Thanks for listening.

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