[Coaching] Using Client Case Studies Effectively in Your Presentations with Cherie Mylordis: Podcast Ep. 317

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We’re going behind the scenes so you can hear how and why to integrate case studies into your presentations.

My guest is Cherie Mylordis, who is currently in our Thought Leader Academy. Cherie and I have been working on her signature talk using our Signature Talk Canvas® framework (based on 3 acts).

In this episode, Cherie and I talk about:

  • Her thought leadership message and framework around a new way of working
  • Why we decided to use case studies as the main content in Act 2 of her talk
  • The benefit of using case studies for thought leadership talks
  • Cherie’s experience as a leader helping to organize the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games
  • Why Cherie decided to enroll in our Thought Leader Academy
  • And more!

About My Guest: Cherie Mylordis is a business transformation expert, leadership coach and speaker. As the founder of nextgenify, Cherie helps future-focused leaders innovate, transform and thrive with a unique, contemporary approach. She inspires her clients to think differently and achieve extraordinary outcomes beyond what they could have imagined. Cherie understands why many transformation programs fail and how to avoid it. She also recognizes that uncertain times create enormous opportunities for innovation, new directions and courageous leadership. With a passion for leadership and organizational culture, Cherie follows inspiring case studies around the world and shares her insights with clients. Cherie is based in Sydney, Australia, and she works with clients around the world. Her track record spans top-tier consulting, large corporates, government departments and non-profits. She credits the five years spent organizing the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games for shaping her approach to purpose-driven leadership and collaboration on a massive scale.

About Us: The Speaking Your Brand podcast is hosted by Carol Cox. At Speaking Your Brand, we help women entrepreneurs and professionals clarify their brand message and story, create their signature talks, and develop their thought leadership platforms. Our mission is to get more women in positions of influence and power because it’s through women’s stories, voices, and visibility that we challenge the status quo and change existing systems. Check out our coaching programs at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com

Links:

Show notes at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/317 

Cherie’s website: www.nextgenify.com

Discover your Speaker Archetype by taking our free quiz at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/quiz/

Join our Thought Leader Academy: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/academy/ 

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317-SYB-Cherie-Mylordis.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

317-SYB-Cherie-Mylordis.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Carol Cox:
Get a behind the scenes look of how to integrate case studies effectively into your presentations with our thought leader Academy client Sherry Milhaud's. On this episode of the Speaking Your Brand podcast. More and more women are making an impact by starting businesses running for office and speaking up for what matters. With my background as a TV political analyst, entrepreneur and speaker, I interview and coach purpose driven women to shape their brands, grow their companies and become recognized as influencers in their field. This is speaking your brand, your place to learn how to persuasively communicate your message to your audience. Hi there and welcome to the Speaking Your Brand podcast. I'm your host, Carol Cox. Today we are diving into an on air coaching call to take a look at how to effectively use case studies, especially client case studies in your presentations, both for thought leadership and for lead generation. So you're going to have a look behind the scenes of the process that we go through when we work with our clients in the Thought Leader Academy on their signature talk. So hopefully you can take what you're hearing today and apply it to your own presentations as well. My guest is Sherry Milhaud's, who is a business transformation expert leadership coach and speaker. She is the founder of Next Gen Phi and she works with future focused leaders. She has an incredible case studies which you're going to hear a little bit about today. Sherry lives in Sydney, Australia, where she was actually part of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, which is also exciting. Maybe we'll have a chance to talk a little bit about that as well. Welcome to the podcast, Sherry.

Cherie Mylordis:
Thank you, Carol. Lovely to be here.

Carol Cox:
Let's dive in first to your thought leadership and the message behind your signature talk, and then we'll kind of take a look at why we decided to incorporate case studies into them so that your audience would have a better understanding of your framework and how to apply it for themselves. So first, let's talk about all of the dramatic changes the entire world has been through in the past few years. And as we've seen so many things that we used to do, we no longer do, there has been shifts in how we understand how we live, how we work. And I know, Sherry, that you have worked with a lot of incredible organizations and leaders over the year, much longer than just the past few years. And so you have really seen the difference between the old way of working versus the new way. Like there's really this paradigm shift that this new way that we can work with just so much more beneficial. Can you tell us a little bit about that contrast?

Cherie Mylordis:
Well, I firmly believe that we've reached this huge signpost in the evolution of work. And whilst we've had so much change in the world of work over four industrial revolutions, we've gone from steam to electricity to electronics and now this cyber physical age. But there are something that haven't changed much at all. And so this is really hiding in plain sight. And most people don't realise that there's some ways of working where we the way we organize our people and the way we organize our work. There are some really outdated practices in there that haven't changed much. And despite that, there are some extraordinary organizations around the world that are doing things very differently, and I've been following them for years. And so those are the key insights that I draw on when I work with my clients to help them see that there are amazing ways of work that can really unleash your people and enable you to achieve extraordinary things for your customers, your clients, etc., as well as business outcomes too. So I believe that because of all the chaos we've been through and all the disruption of the last few years, I believe that as we're all looking to the future and trying to figure out, well, what does the future of work look like, Now's the time to actually draw on some of those more modern practices and bring them in.

Carol Cox:
Can you give us an example of what is an old way of working and why it doesn't work anymore?

Cherie Mylordis:
So I could show you an organization chart from 100 years ago that would not look too different from one that you might see today. So that pyramid, I'm sure many of your listeners would probably work in, in a structure that's quite hierarchical with that pyramid. So you've got those executives at the top, you've got those functions or departments, and then you've got people inside a box, which is a job description, and they show up to work to fulfill what's in their job description. And that's really all they are empowered to do, really, I guess it's worth pondering is 100 year old work practice fit for purpose for how we need to work today, which is so different from what was happening 100 years ago.

Carol Cox:
And then tell us about before we get into the specific case studies. But a big picture of what is this new way of working?

Cherie Mylordis:
The most progressive, extraordinary organizations that I follow. It's all about really getting rid of that hierarchy. It's all about the leaders acknowledging that they don't have all the answers, but what they're there to do is to empower their people. But what they really need to start with is setting that direction. What is our purpose? Not just what does our company do, but what's the impact we want to have in the world or in our community or in our sector and set that north Star What is it that we're trying to achieve? So that people have the vision. What are the problems we're trying to solve? What are the challenges we're trying to address or what are the opportunities we're trying to create and then give people autonomy in how to go after that and also work in a really transparent way. So those are some really magic sort of elements that when you bring those into organizations, your people step up because it draws on that intrinsic motivation and everybody is far more fulfilled at work.

Carol Cox:
Sheree I know that one of the first questions you ask your audience in the talk that we've been working on is how fulfilled they feel at work. And I know that, you know, as the founder and the entrepreneur of speaking your brand, I'm you're very glad that you can say I'm very fulfilled at work because I get to set, obviously the the autonomy and the direction and the vision of what we're doing. But obviously for people who work, for someone else who work at companies, that isn't necessarily always the case. Why did you decide that this question was so important and where did this question come from?

Cherie Mylordis:
So I've been noticing for years, just anecdotally in all the companies I work with, that people just seem to feel in general, not not really fulfilled or not always realizing their potential. And often when I work with people, I can help them realize more of their potential and help them step up. And so if that was what I was sensing, that a lot of people I came into contact with didn't seem fulfilled or didn't seem to be realizing their potential. I wondered if that was more widespread. And so I actually decided to interview 100 leaders around the world last year and find out more about it. And so I asked them how they or their people do they feel like they're doing their best work? Yes, sometimes or no. And then to explain why. And so I gained some really interesting insights that did validate that anecdotal evidence that I had.

Carol Cox:
You were not surprised by what you found, but at the same time, were you a little bit saddened by it?

Cherie Mylordis:
Absolutely. It's really sad that two thirds of people showing up to work every day are either sometimes or not at all doing their best work. Now that's leaving them feeling probably a little flat, a little stone cold as to why am I working? I mean, we spend a lot of hours at work and then there's the commute if we have to go into an office. So we spend an enormous chunk of our life working. And so if we're not showing up and feeling fulfilled and making a difference, then that's that's really disappointing. And not only that, what is that doing for the business? Imagine what value is being untapped in your people and in the outcomes that you can deliver. If two thirds of your people are not doing their best work.

Carol Cox:
Sheree When you decided to enroll in the Thought Leader Academy last fall and then we started working together on your signature talk, and you told me about this incredible research project that you had done interviewing these 100 leaders and getting all of this really rich data from them. I knew that we had to obviously find a way to incorporate this into your talk because it is original research and it is really insightful and something to convey to the audience. But we also knew that you weren't going to stand up there and just like read the research report like you would a white paper, because obviously different format speaking has to be much more interactive and readily applicable for the audience. And so as we were working, you told me about a few companies that really stood out to you as far as this new way of working and shifting this paradigm for themselves and like the before and after. And so I want you to share about a few of those companies. But before we do that, we started working together. You already had a framework that you were using in some previous presentations. Can you tell us a little bit about that framework? We'll do that first and then we'll come back to the case studies.

Cherie Mylordis:
So I gave a talk last year at a conference and I know how important it is to have three key messages or three key elements to your framework. That's the gist of your talk. And so I was thinking about all of the insights that I gained from these extraordinary companies that I work with and what I help leaders do. And it just dawned on me that it came down to three D's and those deeds stand for their ditch and dialogue. And those are really practical ways that anybody can actually shift the dial and do more valuable work and more meaningful work. So the D stands for there because it's about having that bold, audacious purpose and it's really setting that direction that I spoke about earlier. Because if you don't have that, then your people are kind of, you know, they lack that clarity. There could be organizational confusion, and you don't have that alignment either in terms of what matters to people and what matters to the organization. And usually there's a way to find some linkages there. So the first is for DARE, the second day is for ditch, because if you want to work in a better way, there's probably a lot of outdated work practices that you need to get rid of or ditch. That is so important because you need to create space to work in a better way. And people often feel very frustrated with the admin and the, you know, things just bouncing around all the time and they're not getting anywhere. So that was a real thing that came through in my interviews as well. So the second date is for it, and the third day is then to dial up your work practices so that you can embrace some of these more contemporary, proven ways of leading and working to really get the best out of your people and your organization. So that's my three days.

Carol Cox:
Okay, perfect. So you had your three D framework, which is very tangible and very actionable. And I know that the reason that you wanted to work together and the Thought Leader Academy is because you wanted to escape this expert trap that I talk about, which is doing trainings and workshops and getting paid for that by organizations and companies is great and do all the teaching and training that you want in those types of speaking engagements. But I knew, Sheri, that you wanted to level up to do more thought leadership type of talks and keynote type of talk. So I remember as we were working on your signature talk canvas on your board that it's very easy to default to have these three, three D's, this framework. Let's do the dare, let's do the ditch, let's do the dial. Let's teach them about each one and have them think about it for their own organization and which is which is fine. But then we're still stuck in the training versus the thought leadership. But I also, as we had talked about, that the framework is really helpful for the audience to hear, to kind of give them something that is tangible for them. And this is where we come back to the whole premise of this on your coaching call in this conversation is this idea of using case studies to illuminate your thought leadership and still giving them tangible information through their framework, but without it becoming a teaching presentation. And so then so Sheri, can you share a little bit about why you decided to pick the three case studies that you did and how we decided to fit them into the three DS framework?

Cherie Mylordis:
There are two case studies that I included that are clients that I have worked with recently or am working with right now. And then the third one is my favorite, extraordinary organization that I've been following around the world for years, which is a Dutch health care organization called Birdsong. Now, in all of those three cases, I could probably relate the three DS to each of them, but we thought that that might be a little too long winded in a talk. And so what we decided to do was I picked the most relevant example for each day. And so for the first day, which is Dare I picked a professional association that I've been working with in Sydney that was really facing a very dire future because of their business model, is all about in-person events and training and they really needed to rethink rapidly what they were doing and how they were doing it or face that they may not exist. And so this was really all about purpose. We really did dive straight into the purpose and we started there and we created this powerful aspirational purpose statement and that set the tone for everything else that they did in their business transformation and thereafter. So we picked that one for Dan and then for Ditch. The Dutch health care organization was my choice because it's radical in terms of how they they eliminate all bureaucracy.

Cherie Mylordis:
They don't have any managers. They have 75,000 nurses now working in self organized team. So it's self management. They have access to coaches, but they actually have no management. And so their costs are 40% lower than any other home nursing organization in the country. And that's because they've ditched the bureaucracy. They actually have far higher qualified and higher paid nurses than their peers, but they still have 40% lower cost. So I really wanted to call out that example of ditch because they radically question any aspect of of bureaucracy. And then the third one, which is Dial, I've chosen a company I'm working with right now in the Philippines. It's an incredible example of transformation. It's as you know, the Philippines is a developing country and they have many challenges. But there is an amazing organization with a visionary leader who is helping his people become internal entrepreneurs. And I'm one of the coaches that is working with them and helping them go through a series of programs to really help them dial up the way they work. And this leader is open to anything he's saying. You know, I want to know what these extraordinary organizations are doing, and I'm open to bringing anything in to my organization.

Carol Cox:
Yeah, and I love these examples, Cheri, and the work that you're doing and how much it is truly empowering the people who are part of those companies and organizations. The other thing that I want to point out for the listeners is that the benefit of using case studies also in your presentations is that it tends to lend itself to story, which is of course what we want to do. And I know again, so often in our presentations we're really good at the teaching and the training and the explanations and we tend to default less to telling stories. And so having these case studies, then you can tell little vignettes about each one to. You the story integration in your talks. This one just blows me away. Sherry for the Dutch Home Nursing Organization, can you tell a little bit about that case study that before but what was going on in the industry and then how this company completely transformed their approach to home nursing?

Cherie Mylordis:
Sure. Back in the day, maybe decades ago, nurses resided in communities in the Netherlands and they would just look after people in their area, in their neighborhood, and then bureaucracy kicked in and all these layers that pyramid kicked in with layers of supervisors and managers and looking to create efficiencies by bringing in low paid nurses and getting most of the work done by low paid nurses and only bringing in the high paid nurses when possible. So it was very transactional. They timestamped every single activity and what happened was then the elderly, people who needed care in their home, who were often living alone and very vulnerable, they might have up to 40 nurses visit them a month, 40 different people in and out doing their seven minute thing or their 15 minute thing. And so these people were just like very overwhelmed with all these people rushing in and out of their house, these elderly people. And they were feeling lost. They didn't really feel like anyone took responsibility for their care and no one had time to talk to them. So really the whole home nursing model was broken because on top of that, nurses felt very disengaged, very sad, and they just they just felt exploited. And so one of the most senior nurses in that in that system, he stepped out his name of the foster block and he decided to try something different. So he stepped out and he created a little team with a few nursing friends and they started looking after patients in their neighborhood. And the whole mantra was humanity over bureaucracy. And every new patient they met, they started with a cup of tea and they sat down and had a chat and got to know them and tried to understand what their needs were. So every nurse is completely empowered to look after their patient however they see fit, and they just work as a little self-organizing team to work out their schedule. They work off iPads, which has all their clinical information and any admin. And so this one little team has grown now to 10,000 nurses working in neighborhoods all around the Netherlands, and the results are extraordinary.

Carol Cox:
That's great. Sherry. So for those of you listening, notice how this was a before and after. That's what makes a really good case. Study is painting the picture of what was going on before either in the organization or in the industry, who was being impacted, what was what was going wrong, what could have been better. And then the after part of the case study is, of course, then what? What did they end up doing that was so much better? Who benefited and what does that look like today? And then the bridge between the before and after. If it's your own client that obviously you can talk about how you help them to get from the four to the after. In this case for this particular one of the three case studies that Sherry is using, this was not a client, but instead someone that she admires. So she can so Sherry can talk about how they decided to bridge this themselves. The point here is that obviously use case studies that your are your own clients because that's you know them well and you have that expertise and then the audience understands how you can help them.

Carol Cox:
But it's also okay to use a case study from someone who hasn't been your client and to talk about that, if it's something that's really remarkable or something that is just so perfect for the point that you want to make in this case, it is with Hertzog. So, Sherry, let's talk a little bit about one of the other two case studies who was a client or and I know one of them is a client that you're working with. So can you tell us a little bit about the one that you're working on right now in the Philippines, especially for I know, the team that you've been working with closely, they're millennials and so they're there. They definitely have kind of this new this new mode of working is what they enjoy the most and that what makes them feel fulfilled. So can you tell me a little bit about the before and after, not only for the company as a whole, but really for this team and what they are working on?

Cherie Mylordis:
So the company I work with is called Aboitiz, and I've been brought in as part of a team of coaches that are all around the world because I'm part of a global innovation coaching community. So this company, there are 100 year old business. They started as a family business, very small, and they've grown to be a huge conglomerate that covers financial services, power. They're into tech now, they own an airport and they do infrastructure. So a very multi, very large, multi billion dollar conglomerate. And so they're very successful. But the leadership, which is still the family, they want to help make a difference in the world and especially in the Philippines. And so. I really wanted to do something different. So they started an innovation bootcamp a year ago. It was a three month bootcamp where they took teams of people through this coaching method that I'm familiar with. We took people through that and as a result the participants pitch ideas and those ideas are really well. They're tested. They've gone through a very rigorous process and when they pitch those ideas, the executive decide whether to back them. So three millennials that I'm working with now, their idea was an agritech idea. It was endorsed and given some seed funding by the by the executive.

Cherie Mylordis:
And now I'm coaching this team to help them stand up a new venture. So that was quite brave for them because they had a prize role in this incredible company in the Philippines that is very sought after, because in the Philippines there's actually a lot of overseas Filipino workers. So they have to go and work overseas to provide for their family. So if you have a good job in the Philippines, you want to hang on to it. But these millennials decided that they were passionate about this idea that they'd come up with, so they wanted to go after it. And so I'm coaching them through this process now to stand up a new venture. And they were recently recognized by a Swiss foundation that works with the UN Environment Program. But in terms of the idea having global significance, so they're now part of an incubator program. So it's just incredible the shift from these ambitious millennials. Now they're really developing skills to to play on a global stage. They're working with government officials, they're working with international executives, and they're in the pilot stage of bringing their idea to life.

Carol Cox:
That's fantastic. And congratulations to you and to them on these achievements that they're getting and also the leadership skills that they're developing because they are going to have to at some point, whoever is above them in the leadership ranks at some point no longer going to be there. And then you need that next realm of leaders who can take.

Cherie Mylordis:
Over and imagine what kind of leaders they're going to be. Having gone through this process, having entrepreneurial skills, innovation skills, and leading very differently from more traditional organizations.

Carol Cox:
You're doing great work. Sheree To put that to put these leaders out there into these various organizations. All right. So we talked about kind of using case studies in the presentation. So in this case, Sheree is primarily using them at Act two of our signature talk canvas framework. So she sets up kind of what the audience wants as far as this new way of working, what may be getting in their way, and then her her background and her credibility. And then we and then into Act two is the three D framework in using these case studies to illustrate that and to bring in these different stories. And then Act three is the next steps for the audience and the call to action and then her closing. So Sheree, I mentioned in Act One, we bring in your bio and your credibility, and I mentioned in the intro here that you worked on the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, which is so exciting. Can you tell us a little bit about what that experience was like and what you learned from it that you still carry with you today?

Cherie Mylordis:
So I joined the Sydney Olympics Organising Committee of five years out from the Games and I was in the strategy team. And typically when you work for an organising committee, you traverse various roles leading up to games time. So I started in the strategy team, which was a very exciting opportunity. And then once I started I felt quite terrified because, you know, no pressure. Organise the biggest event in the world, fixed deadline. How are we going to do that? I had never been to an Olympic Games before, let alone organised one, and it turned out that the colleagues that I joined with, we were all in the same boat. None of us had been to an Olympic Games before, maybe a couple, but not many. And so we had this enormous task to pull off and what we did was in true Aussie spirit, we just stepped up, we just tried to figure it out and we worked really collaboratively because no single person could pull this off. We all had to collaborate and work together across all of the teams. We tried to learn as much as we could, so I was very fortunate. I got to visit Atlanta and observe the Atlanta Games and gain some insights from that. So we we learnt as much as we could from previous games, but then we came up with our own model and we pulled off an amazing event. And at the closing ceremony, Sydney was declared the best games ever.

Cherie Mylordis:
So we were quite brave in many ways and we did achieve many firsts. And one of them that I'm really proud of is that we were the first organising committee to integrate the Olympic and Paralympic Games together as one event. So it was end to end focusing on all of the athletes and making sure that they all had what they need and that the event was delivered in both cases to a very high standard. Also, the International Olympic Committee took on our body of work for use for all future games city. So our processes, all of our planning and our techniques were then a bit of a legacy for future games. City cities. So yeah, it was an amazing experience. It taught me to be brave. It taught me to be courageous and take on something enormous and take that iterative approach to planning because you can't just cross your fingers and hope it will all be okay on the day. You have to have iterations, you have to have testing, and in our case, our testing was real events. So you ran a series of events. You have to test every sport, every venue, every process. And we had a simulation event a few months out as well, which really put us to the test. So lots of planning and iteration was really what made it work.

Carol Cox:
And these are big numbers, right? Sheree Do you remember some of these like the number of volunteers and and all that?

Cherie Mylordis:
Yes. So I'm one of the architects of the volunteer program for the Sydney Olympics. There were three of us, and so we needed 50,000 volunteers for the Olympic and Paralympic Games. And then I went on to help design the training strategy and the technology that we needed to manage the games workforce. We called it the Games Force, which was a cool name. So in the end we had 150,000 workers at games time with a third of them volunteers. We also worked across 40 different functions and we delivered the services across 128 venues. So big numbers.

Carol Cox:
Yeah, that's incredible. And doing it, like you said, where you all really had to figure things out as you were going and be collaborative and like you said, be brave and try new things, but then also test them and make sure before before the actual real day.

Cherie Mylordis:
Absolutely. And you know, there are very strict standards. Every sport has technical requirements. And so it's not like you can just adapt things. There are very precise rules and regulations that you have to follow for every sport. So we had to make sure that we delivered exactly what was needed very precisely. But how we went about it, we had quite a bit of autonomy. And so what I reflected on when we were talking about my signature talk was that many of the characteristics that I love about these extraordinary organisations I follow today were some of those things that we did to make the Olympic Games so successful. We had a lot of autonomy, We radically collaborated, we stepped up, we did a lot of iterations and experimentation. So yeah, a lot of those things are actually what we see today in those amazing case studies that I follow.

Carol Cox:
Yeah, and I'm not surprised that these this thread for you, Sherry, goes back 25 plus years.

Cherie Mylordis:
Now, it really is hard to believe and there's still an amazing alumni. We're still connected. We used to get together at the anniversary and celebrate anyone that was in Sydney that stopped over COVID. But it's still a very strong community because I think for all of us it was a life changing experience. It was a career defining experience, but it was also a life changing experience, I'm sure.

Carol Cox:
Sherry Let's talk about why you decided to join the Thought Leader Academy. I know you have been listening to the podcast because you had told me that. And so what prompted you to do that? What did you want? What did you feel like you needed the most help with?

Cherie Mylordis:
Well, I identify as that stellar scholar in your speaker archetypes. And so I know that I'm very experienced in presenting and giving workshops and training and all of those things. And I love doing that. But I know there's a different skill to getting up on stage and speaking, and we also have done some of that. It's something that I really wanted to get better at, and I think bringing in that storytelling and just having a really good structure is what I was looking for. So yes, I have been listening to a lot of your podcasts and I gained a lot from that because you share so much wisdom and so many tips and insights. But I wanted to take it further and so I decided to sign up. It was a little challenging with the time zone initially, but that has changed because I think I'm the first Australian to attend the Thought Leader Academy. Hopefully I'm the first of many, but it was something where I think if I decide I want to do something, I'm all in. And so if I have to get up at 4 a.m., sometimes I'll do that because I just want to really immerse myself in a program like this and gain as much as I can from it. And so I know I've given it my best shot and I'm learning from someone who that's your expertise. So this is your thing. You're great at helping people give amazing talks. So I show up and I want to just gain as much value as I can from that, and it's been amazing. I've really enjoyed.

Carol Cox:
It. You've been a fabulous participant and an addition to our community. Sherry. And when you had started back last fall, I know our call time was 1:00 PM Eastern time, which was 5 a.m. the next morning for you in Sydney. And then in January of this year, we we changed the call time to 3 p.m. Eastern time. So now you have an extra 2 hours of sleep every Tuesday, which I'm sure I'm sure is helpful. But I was always so impressed when you would be there at your at the 5:00 AM, your time calls and looking lovely as always. So that was great. So, Sherry. What do you see next? You're going to be graduating from the Thought Leader Academy in March. What's on the horizon for you this year?

Cherie Mylordis:
Well, I'm really keen to get this message out that we have reached a signpost in the evolution of work, because I believe this is a moment of time that is the perfect time to act. Because while we're in that state of flux and we're really trying to figure out what the future of work looks like, if we if all we do is get hybrid working right, then we've missed this enormous opportunity. And so I really want to share that through speaking through articles and other methods, because I just genuinely believe that we will miss an opportunity and we can empower people. We can do so much more. There are so many problems in the world that need solving. And if we were able to connect what matters to us, to the work that we do and unleash that and give people a bit more autonomy, even within their current role, there might be something within the organisation or even with their exact role that they could do more of. So I just feel like this is the moment because once we reset back to whether it's that well-trodden path that we were on before with a bit of hybrid working, maybe a few extra days off to attract talent, if that's all we do when we're really missing an enormous opportunity. So I want to do a lot more speaking and writing to really raise awareness of this, because I think there is very low awareness of these extraordinary organisations that do things radically differently and so much better.

Carol Cox:
And we are ready for a women thought leader, especially in this area, you know, talking about business structure, business organisation, you know, like the structure of capitalism, even like all of that really goes with the work that you do and your message. I'm excited to have you put it out there.

Cherie Mylordis:
Thank you.

Carol Cox:
All right, Cherie, I have a few questions for you so that you can share with me and with our listeners are always looking for recommendations. The first is that do you have a book that you would like to share with us?

Cherie Mylordis:
So I highly recommend Playing Big by Tara moore. She wrote this amazing guide for women to help them step up in their life or their career and really befriending your inner critic and drawing on your inner mentor and being far more courageous. So really great book that I highly recommend.

Carol Cox:
I love that book. I read it years ago and I've read it several times since then. And what's a favourite TEDTalk?

Cherie Mylordis:
Well, I actually want to tell you a favourite podcast instead of a TEDx talk, if that's okay. Sure. And I'd like to call out an Australian podcaster. So her name is Amantha Imber and she is an organisational psychologist and she has her own behavioural science consultancy and she interviews some of the world's most successful people about their habits, their rituals and their strategies for optimizing their day. And so her podcast is called How I Work. It's really good.

Carol Cox:
Oh, okay, I'll have to check that one out. I'm always looking for podcast recommendations and sharing a favourite quote.

Cherie Mylordis:
Yes, so I couldn't go past Amanda Gorman. So you know, she was the inaugural poet at Joe Biden's swearing in ceremony and she spoke and wrote this amazing poem, The Hill We Climb. And I love the final the sentence of this she ends with, which is there is always light, if only we're brave enough to see it, if only we're brave enough to be it. And so I think that is a line that we can all draw on to be more courageous leaders and and to go after something that matters to us. So it really inspires me, and I highly recommend it.

Carol Cox:
Oh, I love that. Amanda Gorman She was amazing at the inauguration and I have her to book of poems that have come out since then. So I'm I'm so excited for her success. Cherie, thank you so much for coming on the podcast and for being part of the Thought Leader Academy. I have so enjoyed working with you on your thought leadership and your signature talk. For those of you listening, if you would like to join us in the Thought Leader Academy, you can get all the details. Speaking your brand Academy. Cherie also mentioned our speaker archetype quiz. Cherie is the stellar scholar, as are many of the quiz takers. No surprise, because we are definitely those left brain analytical, logical thinkers who are great at teaching and training again, which I love and is much needed. And we also want to add and expand our skill set. If you would like to take our speaker archetype quiz to find out which one you are and to get our recommendations, go to speaking your brand slash quiz and it's totally free. Takes just a few minutes is ten questions speaking your brand dot com slash quiz and make sure to connect with Sherry on LinkedIn and on her website. The links to those are in the show Notes page for this podcast episode. Sheree, thank you again so much for coming on the podcast.

Cherie Mylordis:
My pleasure, Carol. Thank you for having me.

Carol Cox:
Be sure to stay tuned to the podcast. Next week. We're kicking off Women's History Month in the United States, and I'm going to be talking about the three stages we go through as women. When we use our voice. So you don't want to miss that episode as well as future ones. So make sure to hit, subscribe or follow in your podcast app. Until next time. Thanks for listening.

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2 Comments

  1. Carla Ellerby on February 20, 2023 at 6:42 pm

    Wonderful conversation highlighting the power of case studies and a fascinating look at the future of work. Thanks Cherie and Carol.

    • Carol Cox Carol Cox on February 21, 2023 at 5:15 pm

      Carla,

      Thanks so much for listening!

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